Chicago Dyke March vs Sort-of Zionists

quick thoughts on this evolving controversy. not trying to fill in a ton of background or write a novel. you can read about it here and then here and then a maybe biased perspective here.

All I want to point out is that this conflict feels EXACTLY like the larger Israeli-Palestinian conflict, or even the larger Trumpian-Leftist conflict: we’re fighting the wrong people, and if everyone who cared just went a little bit out of their way towards doing the Right Thing, we could start fighting the right people. I’ll explain with all three examples (tldr underneath):

Israel vs Palestine:

Good guys: well meaning Israelis and Palestinians who don’t want to see violence towards anyone.

Bad guys: military complexes on both sides benefitting from continued violence.

Solution: good people need to communicate nonviolent intentions to each other and force state policy changes on both sides.

(I don’t pretend I’m solving anything here, obviously this is way harder than that — but trying to do the above is the least (the most?) we can do).

Trumpians vs Leftists:

Good guys: engaged citizens who want to see positive change in their government.

Bad guys: anyone using anger to gain power or attack their fellow citizens.

Solution: good people need to communicate nonviolent intentions to each other and force state policy changes on both sides.

(see what I did there?)

Chicago Dyke March vs Sort-of Zionists

Good guys: jews and queers uniting to prevent both antisemitism and homophobia

Bad guys: anyone letting either anti-palestinianism or anti-semitism cloud their actions

Solution: good people need to communicate nonviolent intentions to each other and force state policy changes on both sides

TLDR:

In this case, if the Jewish marchers had added Palestinian imagery to their flag as well, all of this would have been avoided.

That’s what I mean by communicating nonviolent intentions. Should it be on the Jewish queer marchers in this case to do that? I don’t care. I want to see well meaning radicals (AND well-meaning jews) take the high ground. If the dyke march organizers had still tried to kick them out, then we could have really had a discussion about anti-semitism in radical organizing. Look, I mean I know it’s there, I’ve experienced it too, but as a Jew I’m used to it. I don’t mind going out of my way to help these protestants not be afraid of me. It’s really not hard.