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People are unwilling to learn from past experiences and continue to believe their data is safe.

When Edward Snowden’s revelations broke — I was sure this was the end of the internet as we had known it. But protest died down after a while. The government had found ways to tap into the wealth of information people provide about themselves — but the concerns about that were tame at best. Maybe that was because everyone had suspected this for a while. Sure, there were probably people listening to your phone calls if you mentioned certain words. …


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The Western Depression Epidemic

How come people in Western society are rich beyond the wildest dreams of 18th-century royalty, yet appear profoundly sad? Humans need community!

When I first went to university, I met people from around the country and the world. Everyone was quite alike in their socio-economic status, but also full of different histories and ideas, hopes and dreams. Also, I was surprised by the striking amount of people that were, by own declaration, having issues socializing, had generalized anxiety, or were depressed. This immediately struck me as odd, given everyone’s relative material affluence and bright futures.

Soon after, I realized that recorded cases of depression have been rising across the industrialized world.

At times, doomsayers refer to such statistics to derive legitimacy for…


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Political debate is poisoned in the West. Suddenly, radicals of all persuasions are roaming the streets and even get elected. How did this happen? If someone asked me to give a snapshot of the current politics of the West in January 2019, this is what I would reply:

Europe and the US are an aging and increasingly childless people confronting large-scale immigration. A growing number of people realize that the country their children will live in will look drastically different than what they have known.

This societal anxiety is paired with a long period of relative economic underperformance, historically relatively…


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Life and politics are often about unintended consequences. Our current political debate is unintentionally detrimental to democracy.

Unintentional, because most people are in fact kind-hearted and are merely seeking to make the world a better place. Yet, too often in this pursuit, we make grave errors.

I think that we are currently making a mistake that will cost societies all over the world:

The mainstream discussion after the 2016 election of Donald Trump has circled around questioning whether people know what is good for them and if Russia unduly influenced the election outcome.

Relatedly, the Brexit shock led to many…


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Photo by Mike Chai from Pexels

Political Analysts routinely oversimplify group behavior and reduce group interest to one single issue. Additionally, predictions of electoral outcomes underestimate the importance of a candidate’s ability to motivate people to vote at all.

In a recent podcast episode of the NYT’s “The Daily”, journalists made the breathtaking discovery that Latin Americans in the US care about more than just immigration policy.

Not taking away from the extraordinary quality of the program or the NYT — this episode unveiled a bizarre assumption of American politics. …


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Photo by Julius Silver from Pexels

Critics of globalized trade are currently confronted with a solution to the supposed problem — yet somehow many of them do not approve.

As bizarre as American political debate tends to be — it becomes especially infuriating when encountering blatant manipulation or convenient inconsistencies employed by those discussing it.

Relatedly, much has been made of the idiocy of the protectionist policies promised or even implemented by President Trump. Curiously, this is often done by those who simultaneously cry the loudest against capitalism, globalization, and wage dumping.

This only helps to unveil the ever-declining usefulness of the classic dimensions classifying political…


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Recently, I stumbled upon an intriguing YouTube channel that discusses philosophy in an unusually intelligent and thorough fashion.

One of the channel’s videos is a commentary on ‘capitalist realism’ and how it relates to another YouTuber called ‘Unkle Adams’.

The critique or argument put forward in this video-essay is twofold. On the one hand, the author makes the case that capitalism has co-opted the individual’s imaginary and the collective understanding of the fairness of the system itself by instilling the idea that anyone can ‘make it’ if he just works hard enough.

Any setback or negative outgrowth of the experienced…


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On the campaign trail

The recent media-hype and discussion of Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez might be an indicator that American Politics is poised to continue its course of polarization and radicalization.

After the shock of Donald Trump’s election to president wore off, some more optimistically inclined political commentators pointed out that his presidency was merely temporary and that affairs could go back to normal, or reason, as soon as his term was over.

As it happens, I am not that optimistic. I believe that US politics is most likely to become much more tribal and extreme in the near future.

There are multiple reasons for…


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I have a question and I genuinely hope that someone will be able to enlighten me:

Is there anyone out there that is actually creating new customer products or otherwise classically productive endeavors?

Granted, my confusion on this topic is certainly greatly influenced by the pseudo-intellectual circles I tend to move around in.

But as far as I can tell, the vast majority of the brightest minds of this time are engaged in one of the following activities:

There are people that work in finance and essentially make a living lending money to people that hopefully create products that are successful enough to generate profits. …


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Observing the current free speech debate, it appears that there are the offended on one side and the absolutists on the other.

It is tempting to ridicule college kids who protest against speakers at their Unis and call for hate speech laws and safe spaces.

They appear to be coddled and unable to tolerate anything that makes them uncomfortable.

But that would undermine the seriousness of the issue at hand.

An attempt to outlaw opinions and silence people cannot be tolerated as it is fundamentally incompatible with the ideals of a free society.

Outlawing opinions is inherently anti-democratic as there…

The Political Grow

Politics, Psychology, and the Future https://thepoliticalgrow.blog/

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