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This post was originally published on the Maido blog.

You might notice that we’ve had a little facelift at Maido. Or you might not — and that’s totally fine. What we launched at the end of last year was not really a redesign, but more of a re-align. An evolution rather than a revolution.

Why the change? Maido has evolved over the last few years from working in the purely commercial world to partnering with commercial, NGO, and government organisations who are striving to positively change the world through design and technology. And it’s not only that we’re bringing our…


I’ve already wasted enough words on Brexit to know better than to write yet more, but it somehow feels wrong to not say something on this so-called Brexit Day, as we prepare to officially leave the European Union at 11pm tonight. So here we go. Two final points I’d like to make on the matter.

Firstly, this is not a day to rejoice. This is a day we should be ashamed of. Although not without its flaws, the European Union — union! — represents the way we, as humankind, should be operating in the 21st Century: working together, improving things…


You might notice that we’ve had a little facelift at Maido. Or you might not — and that’s totally fine. What we launched last month was not really a redesign, but more of a re-align. An evolution rather than a revolution.

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maido.com — then and now

Why the change? As we wrote in our last blog post, Maido has evolved over the last few years from working in the purely commercial world to partnering with commercial, NGO, and government organisations who are striving to positively change the world through design and technology. And it’s not only that we’re bringing our experience from both sides of…


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Sometimes it seems like not a week goes by without the launch of a new email client, only for the product to fade away into obscurity after an initial wave of social media excitement — if indeed it launches at all. Ever tempted by the new and shiny, I keep my eye out for such products in the hopes that one might actually make a real difference to the way that I personally interact with email, and my interest has most definitely been piqued by Tempo, which I’ve been trying out in beta for the last few months. …


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This blog post comes to you via my shiny new MacBook Air, which I picked up last week from the Apple Store in Bristol. As I made my purchase, concluding that it was indeed the Air I wanted and not the Pro, and mentally readying myself to bid goodbye to my 2015 MacBook, it struck me just how confusing it is to buy an Apple laptop in 2019. Even the myriad options of hardware configuration aside, the very naming itself — the actual brand of the MacBook Air — seems somewhat confused.

Let’s cast our minds back to the launch…


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The weeks starts out this way, at least.

A couple of years ago, I wrote an article called ‘Working for half a day to be more productive’, and while my intentions were good, that piece suffered from a problem that has affected many of my writings on the subject of getting-things-done: I wrote the piece without having actually settled into the very routine about which I was enthusing, and — lo and behold — I no longer follow my own recommendation, having failed to stick to such a rigid schedule.

But something good came of that attempt: a new and improved method of calendar-planning that still incorporates blocks…


With Apple’s HomePod finally arriving in the hands of pre-order customers last week, recent news headlines about the device have been dominated by reports of the device leaving unsightly marks on customer’s wooden countertops. That the Apple of 2018 can sell a heavily delayed device without rigorous testing is not the subject of this article, however.

Around the time that the HomePod became available to pre-order, I read a very thoughtful piece written by Dieter Bohn for The Verge. In it, he lists the device’s many shortcomings, but concedes that product shortcomings have rarely stopped Apple in the past. …


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Just over five years ago I wrote a piece called ‘Music collections in the era of the cloud’, in which I lamented the then-contemporary streaming services’ inabilities to properly represent a users’ music library in the cloud. A few things have changed since then: Rdio is gone, Apple Music is here (and is still a weird mix of iTunes, the iTunes Store, and radio), Spotify has got pretty good at letting users creating their own libraries (albeit limited to Spotify’s catalogue), and Google Play Music — for all its faults as an uninspiring interface and a looming merger with YouTube…


[This post was originally published on my blog in October 2012. I’m re-publishing it here on Medium, unedited, in 2017.]

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about music recently; specifically, what it means to own and use a personal digital music library whilst subscribing to streaming services such as Spotify, Rdio, Pandora, and Deezer. I published some loose thoughts on The Pastry Box a couple of months ago, but in the weeks that followed, I’ve stumbled across some thoughtful pieces on The Bygone Bureau and Pitchfork that have spurred me into writing something a little more refined. …

Elliot Jay Stocks

Creative Director (@maidoco) & musician (@otherform). Previously: co-founder, @readlagom & @8faces; Creative Director, @colonnacoffee & @adobefonts.

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