Part 3

Applying reflections to your UX Research practice.

Learn to think on your feet. Follow along as I discuss how to apply an important clinical skill — Motivational Interviewing (MI) — to your UX Research practice.

Black and white image of child sitting on floor looking at adults
Black and white image of child sitting on floor looking at adults
Photo by Cristina Gottardi on Unsplash

Continuing my Motivational Interviewing (MI) Medium series with Part 3, this article focuses on the third construct that comprises MI — Reflections. If you’re curious about what motivation interviewing is, take a look at the primer in Part 1 the series. From there, feel free to check out how to apply affirmations in your UX research practice and how they can help you redistribute power dynamics in Part 2.

In this article, I want to explore the art of a reflection as a way to forgo neutrality and continue to explore ways in which I think we as practitioners can leverage evidence-based techniques to practice the kind of research I personally care deeply about — a UX research practice that is equitable, just and actively interrogates power in the development of products and services. …


Follow along as I discuss Motivational Interviewing and how it has helped me cultivate an equitable and engaged UX Research practice. Part 2/4 of the MI series.

Image with caption: Open ended questions, affirmations, reflections, summaries
Image with caption: Open ended questions, affirmations, reflections, summaries
http://accendservices.com/guides/trainingguide-motivationalinterviewing.php

This is the second article in my series about using Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques in UX research. In the last article, I discussed the first construct of Motivational Interviewing (MI): Open-Ended Questions and how they are the direct result of having an open-ended approach, which is critical to gathering actionable data for products and services. At the end of the article, I mentioned we would talk about Affirmations, and here we are!

Before I dive into affirmations, I want to note something I take very seriously. Motivational Interviewing is a technique used by therapists in a clinical setting. I am not a therapist, and although I have been formally trained in MI, I am not advocating that UX researchers should ever become therapists, or that we should encourage users to discuss topics that would cause them distress. UX Researchers should always be keenly aware when the session becomes outside our scope of practice and be ready to redirect when we need to do so.


Learn more about this important clinical technique in this 4 part series! Part I: Exploring open-endedness.

Laptop and modern lamp on a desk with minimalist background.
Laptop and modern lamp on a desk with minimalist background.
Photo by freddie marriage on Unsplash

Years ago, in what feels like a previous life, I was a qualitative and community health researcher at a nationally recognized cancer center. Before I started here at Marketade, the majority of my career was dedicated to the medical and nonprofit industry. I loved the idea of working at the intersection of behavior and medicine. At the time, it seemed like one of the most underrated aspects of healthcare. It still does in some way, but over the course of the years, I’ve noticed it gaining traction among insurance and healthcare providers.

A major benefit working at a cancer center is access to pioneers in the field, and their knowledge of technical skills that they are willing to share. One of the most important things I’ve learned in my career is the Motivational Interviewing technique. This technique was developed by William Miller and Stephen Rollnick for use in therapeutic settings. Over the years, it has been refined and repurposed to help countless people manage addiction, eating disorders and a host of conditions that require patients to make dramatic behavioral changes and stick to them over time. While we rarely get the opportunity to foster those kinds of changes as UX researchers, the crux of motivational interviewing stands to help us work with participants, especially in the generative phases of research. …

About

Emily Williams

UXR @ Marketade

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