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We have the great honor of having a guest on our pod today! We are joined by Katie, a budding musicologist currently studying at the University of Arizona. Today, Zach, Caroline, and Katie discuss society’s reception and reaction to Mahler both during his time and long after. There is discussion of Mahler’s music, conducting style, and public perception.

Also, in case you want to read through it, the article Caroline refers to is “Ein hypermoderner Dirigent”: Mahler and Anti-Semitism in “Fin-de-siècle” Vienna” by K. M. Knittel. Her apologies for not mentioning it in the pod. It’s Friday and brain function was running low.

Content Warning: This podcast does contain discussion of racism and anti-semitic quotes and content.

https://soundcloud.com/caroline-aylward/tea-time-with-mahler-ep-5-welcome-to-the-pod/s-ume9PGRCq8c?utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

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On this week’s episode of ‘Tea Time With Mahler’ Zach and Caroline continue their discussion of ‘interpretation’ with their own interpretation of Symphony №3. They dive into Mahler’s use of nature throughout the symphony, but especially so in movements 1 and 3. They discuss the anthropomorphic treatment of nature through Mahler’s perspective both in a personal sense and for humanity as a whole. We hope you enjoy episode 2!

https://soundcloud.com/caroline-aylward/tea-time-with-mahler-nature-man/s-9ro137joY98?utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

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A new podcast!

https://soundcloud.com/caroline-aylward/tea-time-with-mahler/s-8LWh1DxFura?si=f09ff14fb22f4ebca35b9d6d79b9574f&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

Enjoy two conducting nerds discuss the man, the myth, the legend, the Gustav Mahler over peppermint tea with honey! Today’s discussion is centered around Mahler’s Symphony №2, “Resurrection.” Using Symphony №2 as base camp, Zach and Caroline explore the extent to which a conductor can ‘interpret’ a piece of music. How strictly should one stick to the notes on the page or is there wiggle room to change something as concrete as tempos dictated by the composer? Mahler himself had little regard for sticking to what was one the page. Does that give us other conductors free rein to do what we please? We break down this idea and more in this week’s episode of “Tea Time with Mahler!”

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