Divorce is Not as Awful as ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ Made Me Believe

When I was a kid, divorce was a strange and terrifying concept. My parents have been married for longer than I’ve been alive, so it was always something that…

(As seen on EntryRevel.com)

When I was a kid, divorce was a strange and terrifying concept. My parents have been married for longer than I’ve been alive, so it was always something that happened to “other people”, primarily those whose parents weren’t as good at marriage as my parents. Like just about anyone else growing up in the 80s and 90s, I knew plenty of people whose parents were divorced. But I still only had 9 year-olds’ secondhand accounts of the process, and so I figured it was a horrifying disaster to be avoided at all costs.

‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ DID NOT Help My Fear of Divorce

Nothing shaped my understanding of what it meant to get divorced like that scary-ass movie. After that, I was almost afraid to get married knowing it would ruin my life if I ever threw my kid a party with animals and pissed off my wife. Dude got kicked out of the house, got the shitty car, and had to leave his kids with a humorless Sally Field while eating Chinese takeout in an apartment. Then he had to get his gay brother or cousin or whatever to turn him into an old woman. He caught on fire. He had to smash a cake in his face to satisfy some social worker. His kids yell at him for not sitting down to pee. The court says he’s crazy when they find out he’s a dude. Then he has to stay an old woman forever to keep his job.

Anyway, fast-forward to our modern era: I am an adult who was married and is now quite pleasantly divorced. If you also saw ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’, perhaps you can imagine my surprise when none of that movie stuff happened. It wasn’t even a nasty experience. If I ended up pissed off at anyone, it was probably my own lawyer. He did a fine job, but then I found out he was able to file everything online. Dude didn’t even go to court! If you ask me, the consumer should know when a service provider takes advantage of automation and enjoy the economic benefits accordingly. And that is the message I would like for you (the reader) to take away from this experience.

(I should note that I have no children, so that may be the reason why my experience differed from that of the movie.)