Purposeful work
Alex Wright
141

Thank you, Alex. Great to read the write-up. This was such a great experience and I look forward to building from it… Some musings… I’ve been reflecting much on how to best design for no specific set of intended learning outcomes. Less curriculum/syllabus and more journey/exploration. As an elder said to me recently “might we travel by candlelight instead of flashlight”. I’ve been holding onto the notion that designing for a kind of knowing that isn’t immediately apparent opens to better sets of questions in participants, a greater openness that invites more collaboration and dialogue. A tough sell in a time when we are all so hooked on what we are “getting” from any opportunity that its often difficult to find appreciation of the unknown teacher that is often right in front of us — which most often is the student as the teacher. As a facilitator, I often back out of designing with the ‘candlelight approach’ for fear that it will make everyone too uncomfortable to not know what to expect. Which leads me to think about how many movies and theatre performances we attend and are thoroughly made uncomfortable, surprised, etc — we are more okay to embark on a make believe journey and much less open or trusting to being a part of the improv. I think as curriculum designers/facilitators that we might have much to learn from playwrights, actors, and directors in how we design for transition…

Other reflections might be to design more reflection in the form of many moments of awareness of what feels true to the individual participant, based on content shared, with then more opportunities to connect with other participants in dialogue. Building in opportunities for critical thinking among participants — a great recording from Philopsopher Jean Proust on the Urgent Need for Critical Thinking for my generations and almost all others… https://soundcloud.com/erica-dorn/on-the-urgent-need-for-critical-thinking-jeanne-proust-at-a-night-of-philosophy-and-ideas

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