iCloud storage is an easy and obvious one to add.
Apple Prime and the iPhone Pro
M.G. Siegler
33016

Can you believe that up until the June price reduction they still charged $19.99 a month for 2TB?

At $9.99 a month they are still not yet at my reserve price. But I know a number of folks who paid the $20 (that small sample being indicative of nothing globally), so maybe many more will join their ranks at $10. Apple makes it easy to opt-in, and with the way the average person snaps photos — especially parents emotionally attached to their photos — you upgrade as you need the storage. It may be highway robbery but it sure is convenient to have the highway attached to your garage.

Such obvious resistance to competitive pricing makes me wonder if Apple has the hardcore user in mind at all. Hardcore users know how to get free or cheap cloud storage for photos; Apple’s pricing has indicated it gives zero fucks about said user. Why change now?

I still even wonder how many hardcore users there are of anything out there. Again with the anecdotes, but the vast majority of iPhone owners I know— hell, technology users at all — are twelve o’clock flashers. If their Siri use is indicative of the whole, it’s no wonder Apple’s made scant effort to improve the service. “Hey, team. Let’s add some killer new horsepower to this thing we can’t even get people to use for the most rudimentary of use cases today!”

So while Sonos wants to be The Home Sound System, Apple will be content to sell you a single pod. While Google wants you on their Drive, Apple’s seems content to sell you an OS that can search it. While Amazon wants their assistant in any object you own, Apple’s OK with their staggeringly underutilized assistant being with you at all times in the most important computer you own. Again, what compelling reason is there to target hardcore users today when basic Bennys and Bettys keep buying and underusing gobs of margin padded product?

Now, how long is that model sustainable as the twelve o’clock flashers die off and kids that grew up talking to virtual assistants, my kids, replace them? I don’t know. But it’s certainly a ways off yet.

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