React Native: Best of all worlds

Another open source JavaScript for creating a user interface. Jointly developed by Facebook and Instagram community, a brainchild of Jordan Walka a software engineer with Facebook. It was launched in Facebook’s news feed in 2011 and it was picked up by Instagram in 2012. In 2015 React Native was launched as an open source for the public. It’s script enabled native iOS, Android and Windows platform.

Unlike other frameworks like Titanium and PhoneGap, React Native overcomes the problems brought up by the others like performance, battery usage and feel. React Native differs others types of frameworks, unlike others frameworks which work by wrapping web content in a web view format resulting in UI elements which lack a natural feel to them. To overcome this problem React Native uses JavaScript components backed by original iOS and Android components so the applications one builds is fully native and natural.
Write once, run anywhere (or sometimes everywhere) a slogan created by sun Microsystems to show the benefits of java language, which means java can be developed on any device to be run on any machine which is equipped with a java virtual machine (JVM). These types of codes have changed how applications are thought out and materialized. In the truest sense of the words, React Native is not a write once, run everywhere code. One has to build the UI components specific to the platform. What React Native provides in single skill set which in turn would allow the programmer to access to multiple platforms.
To someone with a web-based JavaScript background, React Native can turn any web developer into a mobile application developer. The React Native is a strong improvement on the existing cross-platform frameworks. Still in its infancy, React Native comes with its own niggles and nags, An incomplete library with most features missing, while new practices are being unearthed. And the releases and updates are few and far between. Even with all these handicaps, React Native’s pros outweighs all its cons. With it’s single JavaScript code base which is enough to create both iOS and Android applications all while upholding the quality, performance and native feel of the applications. Even if it doesn’t make all the native codes obsolete, it still is best of all worlds.

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