I want a President with a moral compass and a mandate to fix campaign finance

In the debate for the Democratic nomination, Hillary’s campaign is now claiming that Bernie says things that progressives want to hear, but that he cannot deliver on those promises.

Through the wonders of YouTube, we can lookup video after video and see Bernie Sanders throughout the years passionately advocating for the same policies he supports today. From my perspective, has been on the right side of every policy and civil right issue. And he has been on that side earlier than Hillary Clinton. Throughout his career he has also had an unkempt head of hair. He’s authentic.

Bernie Sanders has a solid moral compass and he’s intelligent and articulate to boot. He’s been remarkably consistent and he comes off as sincere to both those who agree and those who disagree with him. This is not the norm for those in politics. It is refreshing and important.

This adds up, in my view, to being extraordinarily well qualified to be President.

I recently watched a video montage of prominent Republicans saying “I disagree with Bernie on x y or z policy issue, but at least he’s honest and consistent.” (I’d include that here if I could track it down, I think it was from The Young Turks — Little Help Please?)

These two Atlantic articles address this reality in longer non-video format.

Mutual respect is an important place to start from in order to build consensus and craft good policies. Perhaps we can even unwind recent mistakes like Citizens United, and the Panama Free Trade Agreement.

Our system of checks and balances means that even if we elect Trump, he can’t change policies as fast as an equivalent elected executive in another country who might suspend the constitution and run amok. Still, I sincerely hope that we don’t put our Constitution to the test with “The Donald.”

Obama was certainly kept in check.

Many believe President Obama’s crowning policy achievement was expanding healthcare, but thanks to big $$ contributions from the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries to congressional election campaigns, our new healthcare policies were waterlogged with enormous concessions to big pharmaceutical companies and healthcare giants.

Our system will keep whoever we elect President from moving too fast in any direction, So why think Hillary better suited for this job than Bernie?

  • Will she fight harder than Bernie for the policies she believes are most important, working within our system of checks and balances?
  • Will she be able to work across the aisle better from a position of mutual respect than Bernie can?
  • Is she tainted, like so many congressional members are, by the money she has received from corporate interests?

Hillary Clinton knows the rigors of being the chief executive better than anyone else running. She has served as Secretary of State and as the Senator of New York. Without question, she has an extraordinary body of experience. But does her experience in the White House as First Lady actually make her more qualified?

Bernie Sanders has kept his candidacy free of the corrupting influence of large corporate campaign contributions. I feel he is better qualified to lead from a place of authenticity to redirect the course of our political system away from SuperPACs and back towards citizen equality.

Bernie Sanders’ integrity on campaign finance and his progressive politics make him more qualified than Hillary Clinton, and here’s why. If we’ve learned anything from the last 8 years, it’s that a President can be powerless to make the changes promised during a campaign. If Bernie can go in there and push with a mandate to fix the SuperPAC campaign funding mess, we might have a shot at fixing Congress.

The legislative branch has been hijacked by the corrupting influence of corporate campaign contributions. Bernie Sanders is focussed on this as the first issue that needs to be addressed in order to unlock progress everywhere else. I think Bernie is the most qualified candidate both in terms of being respected be those who disagree with him, and most importantly, because of his uniquely authentic ability to lead the charge to undo Citizens United and restore citizen equality in our democracy.

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