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When your JCL works first time

{Ecosystem} JCL is a fundamental component of programs running on a mainframe. People who are new to the z/OS platform will benefit from automated assistance in creating correct JCL. Experienced engineers may also benefit if they do not write JCL frequently enough to get it perfect the first time. Further, customer sites may have specific standards that even an expert in writing JCL may not always remember.

In this article, I discuss how new Zowe tooling surrounding Broadcom’s z/OS application “CA JCLCheck™ Workload Automation” enables both novice and experienced mainframe engineers to produce correct JCL with confidence that the JCL…


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On-demand JCL Validation

{Ecosystem} In a companion article titled “CA JCLCheck and Zowe ensure that JCL runs successfully at your site”, I describe how Open Mainframe Project’s Zowe technology has expanded the capabilities of Broadcom’s “CA JCLCheck™ Workload Automation” so that JCLCheck can be accessed through REST requests and by command-line scripting from remote hosts.

REST API programming and command-line scripting are great. You can trigger JCL validation from a custom application, a script on your laptop, or within a CI/CD pipeline. However, some consumers will want on-demand validation of JCL that they are currently editing. …


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Photo by ZSun Fu on Unsplash

Introduction

{Core} Gregory MacKinnon’s article titled “Zowe API Security — securing the open mainframe” and Dan Kelosky’s article titled “Zowe CLI: Token Authentication, MFA, and SSO” provide an important foundational understanding of security concepts that lead to Zowe CLI’s use of tokens to authenticate a user. In this article I describe the reasons why token handling is important for the Open Mainframe Project’s Zowe CLI, how tokens operate in the CLI, and how consumers configure and use tokens.

In a companion article titled “Token Handling in Zowe CLI plug-ins” I describe how development teams can modify Zowe CLI plug-ins to be…


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Photo by Science in HD on Unsplash

Introduction

{Core} In the article titled Using tokens in the Zowe CLI, I describe how and why tokens are used in the Zowe CLI. In this article, I describe how Zowe CLI contributors can modify their Zowe CLI plug-ins to use authentication tokens.

All core Zowe commands have already been modified to work with tokens. For a Zowe CLI plug-in to gain token-handling capabilities, the plug-in development team must make the programming modifications described below.

Some profile options should no longer be required

The following options can be stored in a base profile: host, port, user, password, rejectUnauthorized, tokenType, and tokenValue.

If you want any of these options to…


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Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

A key concept within the Zowe ecosystem is the creation of a REST infrastructure API to access the functionality of an existing application. A component named zowe-rest-api-commons-spring provides a layer of functionality on top of Spring Boot to facilitate writing a REST service that interacts with a z/OS application. The “commons” component can be found within the GitHub repository: sample-spring-boot-api-service. You can use capabilities provided by the commons component when writing your own REST API, which include:

  • Authentication
  • Authorization
  • Running a thread with the security environment of your end user
  • Facilitating the discovery of your API by the Zowe API…

Gene Johnston

I am a principal software engineer at Broadcom and a contributor to the Command Line Interface component of the Zowe project.

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