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Growing up in the 90’s, I got my comedic kicks from three primary sources: Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, and Weird Al. Looking back, it’s obvious that Nicktoons and Cartoon Network shows were loaded with adult humor — but I never suspected there were parts of these shows not meant for me. I remember watching shows like Rocko’s Modern Life with my parents, and they’d occasionally laugh at something but I didn’t know why. Wanting to be a smart, sophisticated eight-year-old, I’d laugh, too — and get grave looks of concern from my parents who would promptly change the channel. As an adult I can still enjoy these shows, but the experience is entirely different. Things that used to be funny aren’t, and things I didn’t understand before are now shocking but mostly really, really funny. Yet, somehow, I feel betrayed. The shows I held so dear were not what I thought they were. Despite the frequent mantra of “Kids rule!” and “We’re smarter than those dumb grownups!” …


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Honestly, who wouldn’t want to see an animated film about cats? Only stupid people, that’s who. Especially when it’s this good — Furies by Sara Petty is one of my absolute favorite animated films, and it’s finally available online.

For years, there were only a handful of prints in existence. It’s incredibly rare, despite the constant stream of accolades it’s garnered since its 1976 release.

I first saw Furies in college, when my projectionist buddy curated an animal-themed shorts block. He was nice enough to let me video tape the screening, and I held onto that poor-quality bootleg for dear life. Whenever a hard drive was about to go, that crappy quicktime file was always the first thing I transferred. But three months ago, the saints at the iotaCenter put a high-quality copy on their Vimeo channel for free. …


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You might not have heard of the Brothers Quay. You’ve almost certainly heard of the band Tool, though, because a) life is unfair, and b) Tool fans are as persistent as Jehovah’s Witnesses in trying to get you on board. But now, dear reader, you can shut the door on that obnoxious mansplainer who’s always telling you how the video for “Sober” is genius. Because it’s not. It’s actually really, really similar to a film that came out 15 years prior, made by the aforementioned Quays. It’s called Street of Crocodiles, and it’s super freaking weird.

Street of Crocodiles is loosely based on a short story by Bruno Schulz. But don’t try to figure out what’s going on because you’ll give yourself an aneurysm. …


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Buster Keaton in The Railrodder, 1965

Did you know that Buster Keaton once made a film with the guy who directed Heavy Metal? And did you know that it was produced by the National Film Board of Canada to promote tourism? And did you know that it’s the most glorious 25 minutes of a man riding a rail speeder ever?? Such a film does exist, and it’s called The Railrodder. And you should absolutely watch it.

The Railroader has a simple premise: Keaton plays a British man so inspired by a newspaper ad that he jumps into the Thames, swims the entire Atlantic, and reemerges on the shores of Canada (in a scene that I can’t prove was stolen by Monty Python, but you know, the show did come out the following year). From there, he hops on a railway speeder and effortlessly rides across the country. The speeder never runs out of fuel, and the storage compartment might be a portal to another dimension. When he finally gets to the west coast, a Japanese man walks out of the Pacific, hops on the speeder, and takes off toward the Atlantic. …


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This month marks the 25th anniversary of quite possibly the most adorable horror-comedy-musical ever made. Alright, it’s one of those “so-bad-it’s-good” movies, but this one should particularly interest fans of South Park or The Book of Mormon. I’m talking, of course, about Matt Stone and Trey Parker’s first feature: Cannibal! The Musical.

Matt and Trey were seniors at the University of Colorado when they wrote the script, raised $100,000, and shot over spring break with the help of students and professors. …

About

Evan Josephine Meyer

Fully-caffeinated film nerd.

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