Image for post
Image for post

Just months away from a historic presidential election being held amid a deadly pandemic, a national reckoning on race and an unprecedented economic collapse, young people — especially college students — could help decide who wins the White House.

A poll of 4,000 students, taken Aug. 9 to 12 and funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, “College Students, Voting and the COVID-19 Election,” offers the newest, best insights into what college students think about this unusual election, how they’re likely to cast a ballot, and whether they will trust the outcome. …


Image for post
Image for post

Cities face an uncertain future in the wake of Covid-19. Some predict a new wave of urban flight as public health, employment and affordability challenges intersect with an upsurge in remote work and connectivity that allows for more mobility. A recent Harris poll revealed that 39% of city-dwellers are currently considering moving to a less dense community. Others say the crisis will spur a reimagination of social infrastructure and urban life together as innovative leaders start to look ahead, become more nimble and revisit city plans to build back better, more resilient communities.

As the pandemic causes us to evaluate where and how we live, understanding what connects people to place is more important than ever. But what exactly generates a real attachment to the community over the long term? What provides the stickiness or emotional and practical commitment to stay rooted in a community over time? …


Image for post
Image for post

On May 5, 2020, Gallup and Knight Foundation released a new report on college students and their attitudes about Free Speech. Knight’s Evette Alexander shares insights below. View the full report and additional insights here.

For some time now, the practice of free speech on college campuses has been challenged by America’s increasingly complex social and political fabric — particularly heading into a hotly contested presidential election year. Yet, as the primary season began to unfold, so did a global pandemic that dramatically altered the college experience for millions of students whose classroom discussions and campus chats moved strictly online. Only time will tell whether and when there will be a return to normalcy on campus, yet the views of young people on free expression are likely to influence how we regard the First Amendment and the rights it enshrines in the U.S. …


Image for post
Image for post

On February 19, 2020, Knight Foundation released a new study that sheds light on the 100 million Americans who don’t vote, their political views and what they think about the 2020 election. Knight’s Evette Alexander shares more below. View the report website, the full report and the full press release for more information.

We’re well into campaign season in what could be one of the most divisive elections in living memory. …


Image for post
Image for post

On Dec. 17, 2019, Knight Foundation released a two-part study analyzing the political dynamics of 86 million tweets. Download part one of the study here, download part two of the study here, and read an analysis below from Evette Alexander, Knight Foundation director for learning and impact.

The old adage remains true: birds of a feather flock together, even in the digital skies of social media.

In an effort to better understand the landscape of political news and engagement on Twitter, Knight Foundation commissioned a two-part study — “The Politics of Social Media” — to capture and analyze over 86 million tweets across the political spectrum and better understand journalists’ viewpoint on the role they play in political conversations on the platform. …


Image for post
Image for post

On November 20, Knight Foundation released a new report, “High School Student Views On The First Amendment: Trends in the 21st Century.” Knight’s Evette Alexander shares details below. For more insights, read this post by Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright and this post by Joan Donovan.

During one of the largest youth movements in history, American high schoolers joined their peers across the globe this September in school walkouts and mass protests to demand action on climate change. In New York, they chanted: “We will make them hear us,” and many girls wore green hair and makeup to express solidarity with the environment. …


Image for post
Image for post

College campuses have recently undergone a pivotal generational shift. Millennials have left the nest of higher education and entered the workforce. Undergraduates on campus now hail from the tip of the next age cohort known as Generation Z. They are the true digital natives born into an always-on world. The very oldest was four on 9/11, seven when Facebook launched, 10 when the iPhone came on the scene and 19 — freshly eligible to vote — in the 2016 election.

To better understand this generation’s emerging views on issues of freedom of expression and diversity inclusion, Knight commissioned mobile-first polling platform College Pulse to undertake a national study of more than 4,000 of these full-time, four-year degree seeking students. This research joins our longstanding efforts to study and understand the future of the First Amendment, and builds on previous college student surveys in collaboration with Gallup released in 2016 and 2018 respectively. …

About

Evette Treewater Alexander

Knight Foundation / Dir. Learning & Impact

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store