Reviewing Gastrointestinal Health Trends: American Cancer Society Publishes New Recommended Age for Colorectal Cancer Screening

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WHAT HAPPENED?

In 2017, the American Cancer Society (ACS) revised its cancer screening guidelines, lowering its recommended screening age from 50 to 45 and, in the process, adding 21 million more Americans into the screening population. This change came as ACS researchers observed that colorectal cancer (CRC) incidences among younger adults under the age of 50 increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013 despite an overall decrease in CRC cases. Young adults now have the same risk for CRC as those born in the 1890s.

REASONS…


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WHAT HAPPENED?

In 2017, the American Cancer Society (ACS) revised its cancer screening guidelines, lowering its recommended screening age from 50 to 45 and, in the process, adding 21 million more Americans into the screening population. This change came as ACS researchers observed that colorectal cancer (CRC) incidences among younger adults under the age of 50 increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013 despite an overall decrease in CRC cases. Young adults now have the same risk for CRC as those born in the 1890s.

REASONS:

The cause of this increase has not been conclusively determined. Among general cancer risk factors like smoking or alcohol consumption, the ACS has identified rising obesity and reliance on the “Western Diet” (red and processed meat, refined sugars, high fat foods) as possible risk factors. Some research also suggests that the increase may be partially attributed to genetic or environmental factors. With no indication these lifestyle trends will weaken soon, the incidence of early onset CRC will continue to rise. Based on current projections, the incidence of CRC in patients ages 20 to 34 is expected to increase by 124% by 2030. …


As many of you know, Geneoscopy uses RNA biomarkers in stool to develop diagnostic tests to prevent, detect and treat gastrointestinal disease. RNA is essential to our platform, but many of our competitors in the field use DNA. So why have we chosen a different path?

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Note: The DNA path is well traveled, while the RNA path requires more intense hiking shoes.

In this article, we will touch on the following questions: What is the difference between DNA and RNA? Why is RNA a better diagnostic tool than DNA? If RNA really is better, why aren’t other companies using it?

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What is DNA? DNA contains the genetic code that determines cellular and bodily functions. DNA is composed of four different types of nucleotides, which are rearranged to form different genes. Each cell in your body houses two copies of DNA and has the exact same genetic code. …

Elizabeth Wurtzler

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