5 Simple & easy interview tips

1. A lot of candidates feel as if the interviewer was not prepared for the meeting, like they have just printed off their CV 5 minutes before the interview and don’t really know who is sitting in front of them. An Interview is a two-way street. Good Candidates put in lots of time and effort to prepare — show them the same respect.

Read over their CV thoroughly before meeting them, perhaps mark up points you want more information on, or have questions about — this highlights a genuine interest in the Candidate and forethought by yourself — presenting your company in the best light.

If you’re really keen on their CV, why not look up if they have a Twitter/LinkedIn — and mention something from there, this will really impress them.

2. Punctuality. Candidates can unfortunately be late, often it is not taken well by a potential employer. However, when an employer is late, candidates are often expected to be okay with this and act as if it’s normal, which can be very off putting to a potential employee.

If you are going to be late, try to alert the Candidate beforehand and of course do apologise sincerely. If they are late and have a good reason then try to be understanding, if they were rescuing a cat from a tree I think you can forgive them, right?!

3. Not differentiating your company from others. Yes, you may have the most innovative, cool and scalable product out there — but so do your competitors. Your branding and PR may be excellent, you might have thousands of social media followers — but so do your competitors. What is actually going to make you appealing to the best talent?

The bottom line?

It is likely to be your culture, attitude and approach to business — highlight these things, not just through buzzwords (think ‘innovative, cutting edge,honest, team spirit’) but through real life examples.

Using videos and producing useful content is a simple yet effective way of passive talent attraction. The way your job adverts are written also speak volumes, most ads out there today are a list of requirements and daily tasks — is that really attractive to anyone? Boring.

4. We spend most of our time at work and the people around us can have a strong effect on our performance and job satisfaction. You can describe your culture to candidates,


letting them meet a range of people in the office, even just for 5 minutes will give them a real insight into their potential colleagues. Coming into a new job and not knowing their environment can be daunting and could lead to retention problems. If you want to progress a candidate, bring in other staff members to talk to them.

5. The most commonly complained about on LinkedIn… “no feedback”. You are very busy, have very little time to give feedback but candidates have given you their time and effort, we suggest being reciprocal.

So, I suggest just sparing a few minutes to give them personalised feedback. The job market is tough for everyone, every little helps — think of the feedback as a way to promote the integrity of your brand, leave candidates with positive thoughts of you.

You don’t want to be tagged in the next LinkedIn disgruntled candidate rant do you!?

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.