An Inquiry into the Cultural Meanings of Landscape Photography

[Editor’s note- The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Exposure magazine, the journal of the Society for Photographic Education. Throughout the year, we will be republishing a selection of essays that were first published in the pages of Exposure, to introduce a new generation of photographic educators and students to this rich history.

The article is presented as originally published in Exposure 23:4 Winter 1985 pp 5–18. Following the article is a series of Letters to the Editor by William Jenkins and Deborah Bright, published in Exposure 24:2 Summer 1986 pp 51–53.]

Introduction by Deborah Bright, December 2019

It’s 1985. …


An Interview with Natalie Krick, by Tom Winchester

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Installation of Natalie Krick’s “Rhymes of Confusion” at SF Camerawork

Natalie Krick’s Rhymes of Confusion, currently on view at SF Camerawork, can be described as a collection of photographic collages. A combination of still life and portraiture, many of the pieces depict absent figures by collaging cut-outs from photographic prints, and, in some cases, exist as free-standing sculptures. The physical aspects of Krick’s artworks investigate the in-camera and post-production manipulative capacity of photography, and appear to react to how most images we see today are on screens. In this way, her creative process is similar to artistic approaches by Letha Wilson and Sara Greenberger Rafferty.


By Maja Jerrentrup

The lady with horns or antlers is a particularly popular theme in model photography. For more than 10 years I have been participating in the scene of (amateur) model photography and have seen this trend emerge. However, it came as a bit of a surprise to me: while most themes draw inspirations from fairytales or singular motifs that are obviously deeply rooted in our culture, the horned lady is not so easy to explain. …


An Interview with Pete Brook, by Kate Palmer Albers

Pete Brook is a writer and curator focused on photography, prisons, and power. I first heard him speak about his work in 2014 during his talk at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s symposium “Bearing Witness”. Since then, I’ve learned more, through his exhibition Prison Obscura (2014–2016) and his website Prison Photography, which has featured the photographs of Isadora Kosofsky and Jacobia Dahm, both mentioned in the conversation below. I was particularly interested to learn about his recent foray into teaching, under the auspices of The Prison University Project at San Quentin Prison in northern California’s Marin County. …


[Editor’s note- The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Exposure magazine, the journal of the Society for Photographic Education. Throughout the year, we will be republishing a selection of essays that were first published in the pages of Exposure, to introduce a new generation of photographic educators and students to this rich history. What follows in an Introduction by Ariel Evans and a Prelude by Martha Rosler, both written in 2020, followed by a 1984 version of the original essay.]

Some Audiences of Martha Rosler’s “Lookers, Buyers, Dealers, Makers: Thoughts on Audience”

by Ariel Evans

Let us now imagine a relation between viewer and photographic project in which the producer actively shares a community with the audience in a different way from the community she/he shares with other producers.¹ …


Visual Literacy and Collaboration, by Meg Griffiths

Photography students incoming, many born in the 2000’s, will have interfaced with digital devices such as cell phones, tablets, and computers most of their lives. Given this reality, particular challenges and responsibilities require educators in the 21st Century to create innovative curriculum, while embracing use of new (and existing) technology within the classroom, as well as to train student populations to use these devices in ways that support thoughtful research, active learning, and collaborative practice. But larger than this, our responsibility is to teach them what visual literacy is and means in the arts.

It is important, here, to be clear about what visual literacy means. As defined by Phillip Yenawine, former Director of Education at the Modern Museum of Art in New York, “Visual literacy is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.” …


Reassessing the Integration of Theory and Practice in Undergraduate Photography Curricula

[Editor’s note- The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Exposure magazine, the journal of the Society for Photographic Education. Throughout the year, we will be republishing a selection of essays that were first published in the pages of Exposure, to introduce a new generation of photographic educators and students to this rich history. The article is presented as originally published in Exposure 32.2, Summer 1999, pp. 11–18]

Introduction by Steven Skopik, Dec. 2019

When I was approached to republish my 1999 article “Postmodernism and Pedagogy: Reassessing the Integration of Theory and Practice in Undergraduate Photography Curricula” as part of SPE’s initiative to offer select works from the Exposure archive on the journal’s digital platform, I was of course pleased and honored. I was also a little apprehensive. …


By Eric Weeks, Chair of Photography & Video Department at Pennsylvania College of Art & Design

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Nat Raum (center) and others at the 2019 MidAtlantic SPE Chapter Conference

The Mid-Atlantic Region held the Photography Practices in the Mid-Atlantic Region conference on Saturday, October 12th at the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design (PCA&D) in Lancaster, PA. Over 70 photographers, educators, graduate and undergraduate students attended the event. The conference committee consisted of Co-Chairs PCA&D Professor Emerita Christine Welch, PCA&D Photography & Video Department Chair Eric Weeks and PCA&D faculty member David Johanson. Invaluable guidance and assistance was provided by SPEMA Chapter Chair Rebecca Michaels, Co-Chair Elena Volkova and Treasurer/Secretary Jeanne Anderton.

PCA&D last hosted the Conference in 2014, and we were excited to welcome members to our campus this year. MIKE MOLLA, President of the college, began the one-day event by welcoming attendees and expressing his support for both the PCA&D Photography & Video Department and the SPE MidAtlantic Chapter. …


By Sara-Jayne Parsons, Director & Curator of the Art Galleries of TCU, Fort Worth TX.

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Wenlock Estate, London during Shoreditch Festival, 2007. All images courtesy of The Caravan Gallery

Challenging recognized conventions of social documentary photography and employing a range of investigative strategies within a socially engaged practice, The Caravan Gallery is a collaboration between artists Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale. Basing their activities in and around a 1969 holiday caravan which functions as a mobile exhibition venue, a center for research and a site for activities that engage visitors and encourage creative participation, The Caravan Gallery has presented a subjective and diverse interpretation of contemporary life in Britain since 2000. Using color photography to make postcards, prints, and a variety of publications, The Caravan Gallery produces and displays photography that responds to people and place, from the everyday to the extraordinary. Williams and Teasdale’s candid images offer cultural critique by arresting surreal or humorous moments; they provide, as one critic has concluded, “affectionate appraisal.”¹ They highlight eccentricities found in daily life and draw attention to ironic juxtapositions that might otherwise go unnoticed or underappreciated. …


[Editor’s note- The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Exposure magazine, the journal of the Society for Photographic Education. Throughout the year, we will be republishing a selection of essays that were first published in the pages of Exposure, to introduce a new generation of photographic educators and students to this rich history. The Re-Exposure series starts with this essay by writer and critic A. D. Coleman, adapted from his Keynote address at the 1978 SPE Annual Conference.]

Author’s note, November 2019:

Reviewing this talk more than four decades after its delivery, it pleases me to confirm that, first and foremost, I conceived and developed it as a genuine keynote address — not the usual off-the-shelf self-congratulatory presentation of one’s own work that, then as now, passes as such at most SPE regional and national conferences, but an occasion-specific provocation aimed at that particular audience and moment.

exposure magazine

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