A series of stories analyzing and comparing how the world leaders addressed their nations when the COVID-19 pandemic has hit the ground.

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Photo by Jørgen Håland on Unsplash

The year 2020 will be forever remembered as the year when the world was caught completely off guard. On the one hand, COVID-19’s unique mechanism ensured its spread at an early stage of infection even before the person carrying it even knew s.he was contagious. On the other, globalization in the 21st century allowed everybody to travel everywhere in no time. This unique combination has unified the world in an unprecedented challenge worldwide: the virus hit everybody hard, fast, and did it everywhere.

A Leaders’ Challenge

The challenge for a country leader in such a situation is enormous. How does one address a nation when the fear and uncertainty get the best of everybody, and there are barely answers to questions that are on everyone’s minds?


How world leaders addressed their nations when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the ground.

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Photo by Florian Wehde on Unsplash

Preface — A Leader’s Challenge

The challenge for a state leader during situations like the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak is enormous.

How does one address a nation when the fear and uncertainty get the best of everybody, and there are hardly any right answers to questions that are on everyone’s minds?

How does one harness the entire nation to cooperate under such difficult times?

For us, the people, it’s a unique opportunity to zoom out and examine how our leaders communicate with us, compared to the rest of the world in the same situation.

Read the full preface 👈🏻

🇩🇪 Germany — Angela Merkel

Source: Germany federal governments’ official YouTube channel

Chancellor Merkel begins her address to the German people by saying “…millions of you can’t go to work, your kids can’t go to…


How the world leaders addressed their nations when the COVID-19 pandemic has hit the ground.

Image for post
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Photo by Nsey Benajah on Unsplash

Preface — A Leader’s Challenge

The challenge for a state leader during situations like the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak is enormous.

How does one address a nation when the fear and uncertainty get the best of everybody, and there are hardly any right answers to questions that are on everyone’s minds?

How does one harness the entire nation to cooperate under such difficult times?

For us, the people, it’s a unique opportunity to zoom out and examine how our leaders communicate with us, compared to the rest of the world in the same situation.

Read the full preface 👈🏻

🇫🇷 France — Emmanuel Macron

Source: France 24

Prime Minister Macron begins his address by saying “my thoughts go out to those who are affected by the coronavirus and their families.”


This story is part of a series analyzing and comparing how the world leaders addressed their nations when the COVID-19 pandemic has hit the ground.

Image for post
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Photo by freestocks on Unsplash

Preface — A Leader’s Challenge

The challenge for a state leader during situations like the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak is enormous.

How does one address a nation when the fear and uncertainty get the best of everybody, and there are hardly any right answers to questions that are on everyone’s minds?

How does one harness the entire nation to cooperate under such difficult times?

For us, the people, it’s a unique opportunity to zoom out and examine how our leaders communicate with us, compared to the rest of the world in the same situation.

Read the full preface 👈🏻

United States 🇺🇸 — Donald Trump

Source: CNBCTV

At the beginning of his speech on March 11th, President Trump promises to protect the American people from the “foreign virus.”


From playing computer games indoors, to doing CrossFit three times a week.

In addition to this story, there’s also a contributing episode which you can listen to in the Capiens podcast with Asaf Raz, a Crossfit trainer, and a life coach in the making. 📣

I grew up in a small town in Ukraine, and I wasn’t the most active kid on the block. But still, the only after-school activity for us was playing outdoors with friends, running around, riding our bicycles, and going to swim in the local river.

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

When I was eleven, my family moved to Israel. The adjustment was as hard as it gets for a sixth grader — the language and cultural differences have left me with almost no friends. In case that wasn’t enough, August heat in Israel can climb up to a whopping 40℃ (104℉). In this sunny hell, I wished to be anywhere but outdoors. My folks just got me my first computer (back in 1997 it was a thing), and so I became a couch potato - playing games and the piano… and that’s it. …


It all started with our ancestors picking up a stick, and me making a poop stool 💩.

In addition to this story, there’s also a contributing episode which you can listen to in the Capiens podcast, starring the very guy who played a big part in my woodwork experience — Niv Rubin 📣

One of the things I’ve always wanted to try was woodwork. There’s something to it that feels very close to our ancient human core, something that represents a genuine human capability in my mind. Just think of it: it all started with a stick our ancestors once picked up, and today there are so many objects and products we use in our everyday lives! …


Letting go of what I want to be and following who I already am.

Hey there! This is a very beginning of me, sharing my journey as a capable human being. If you’re human — get onboard, it’s going to be a hell of a ride! If you’re like me and prefer listening to reading — you can hear this as an episode on my podcast 📣. Ready? Here we go.

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Photo by Sharon McCutcheon: https://www.pexels.com/photo/4k-wallpaper-adorable-blur-boy-1148998/

I was born and raised with a clear understanding: if I wish to be really good at something I have to give my full attention to it and practice it to perfection. This perfection was expected out of the box — it comes pre-packaged with being born in a post-soviet family. But there are so many things that I want to do! …


It’s their intentions and actions that deserve our appreciation.

“You are what you do.” [C. G. Jung]

We are the choices that we make. Every morning we get up and decide how to spend the rest of our lives. We choose what to study, which career paths we pursue, the places we live. When it comes to other people in our lives, however, why can’t we apply the same pragmatic judgment standards? It appears that most of the times we’re simply biased.

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Photo by Kaique Rocha from Pexels https://www.pexels.com/photo/action-adult-architecture-blur-266046/

The Worship Bias

There’s this political party. Your parents and grand-grandparents have always voted for it. Right now, however, that party is led by someone who’s above his head in corruption investigations and sexual harassment allegations.


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When building a company or a product, a lot of times you end up at a crossroads where your integrity and commitment to being a company people can trust is tested. If you’re in the medical or banking fields, you don’t even have a choice — there are regulations instead. Not all of them are perfect, but it’s better to have some rather than none.

When building a commercial entity, however, you have the full spectrum at your disposal. If you’re in the Artificial Intelligence business, and you work with people’s private data, you have a huge responsibility.

Defining Trust

In his post, The Cost Of Our Dishonesty, Dan Ariely explains how easy it is to lose trust. When trust is lost, regaining it is one of the most difficult challenges in a relationship — it might be the hardest of all. …


I have lately adopted an annoying habit:
I ask designers what they do for a living.

It usually goes like this:
- Hey, where do you work?
- I’m a Senior Designer at ___________.
- Cool. And what do you do there?
- Well, we make websites and mobile apps for a bunch of clients.
(Now here comes the annoying part)
- OK, but what do you do?
- I’m in charge of a team of five junior designers.
- Yeah, but
what do you do?
- Well… I’m… what?

If I’m lucky enough not to get punched in the face, it usually turns into an interesting and thoughtful conversation about purpose, meaning and value. …

About

Fade Rudman

Empathy advocate, musician, volunteer EMT, experience designer.

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