Vincentians of Wherever: Leaders

One of my Vincentian friends sent me a link to an organizational development slideshare presentation about leaders and leadership that reminded me of work being done by Vincentians at DePaul University as part of Vincent on Leadership: the Hay Project. (You can view this interesting slideshare at the end of this article.) The Hay Project is great example of how people have “caught the fire” — they are people who share the charism of St. Vincent because they have been or are associated with fine Vincentian institutions like DePaul University. They are now helping to form Vincentian leaders. The Project is on Facebook and Vincentian leaders are all over the globe. The project’s description takes note of these “Vincentians of Wherever:”

Over 400 years ago, in France, Vincent de Paul achieved widespread recognition for his activism, faith and commitment to organizing and establishing networks of people who provided services to the poor. Today, nearly half a century later, millions of individuals in Vincent-inspired organizations and institutions carry forward de Paul’s vision and values in work in social services, education, healthcare, and service-based organizations.

I have now visited with lots of people who want to have access to the richness of the Vincentian charism and the practical insights that have been derived from our lived tradition as Vincentians. Every Sunday — and on other special days as well — .famvin will feature something of the work or experience of individual Vincentians who are living the charism and trying to shape their lives and their careers because the tradition of Vincent, Louise, Frederic, Elizabeth Ann and others are or have been a part of their lives. A special focus will always be on how you are leading but with a Vincentian style. Do you want to be part of this? contact us through Facebook or Twitter message, or by using the contact form here on the site. Here’s a link to the slideshare I promised. Enjoy it. Does some of it remind you of Vincent?

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