North American FTTH: The Latest Research

Fiber Growth Remains Strong: Now Passing 30 Million Homes in the U.S.

Key Stats Include:

  • North America has experienced record growth in fiber to homes for the last 3 years with 2016 year over year growth totaling 16%. In fact, 2016 saw 4.2 million homes passed, roughly tying with the previous record set in 2008.
  • During 2004–2013, large telco’s (Verizon, AT&T, CenturyLink and Frontier) accounted for about 83% of the FTTH build, while other providers added just 17% of the annual additions. But in the last three years, the large telcos only accounted for about 52% of the build while the “other 1000” FTTH providers added 48% in aggregate.
  • Homes connected to fiber networks in the U.S. rose to 13.7 million. Although aggregated take rates have fallen slightly to 45%, this decline is common during periods of aggressive build — as backbone builds occur faster than connections.
Smaller providers are playing a large role in fiber’s growth.
True FTTH now passes over 30 million homes in the U.S
What’s especially noteworthy is the fact that FTTH deployment is occurring much faster than previous U.S. builds of communication pathways to the home.

For Full Access to the Study Join the FTTH Council Today.

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A non-profit association dedicated to all fiber broadband networks — fiber to the home, to the business, to everywhere.

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Fiber Broadband Association

Fiber Broadband Association

A non-profit association dedicated to all fiber broadband networks — fiber to the home, to the business, to everywhere.

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