Adding Neo4j GraphDB manipulation via React Beautiful dnd

Graph of a table with columns and tasks

This tutorial assumes you have basic familiarity with React, Apollo, and Neo4j

While planning my most recent side project, I decided to play with a feature that I’ve always wanted to mess with on the front end, drag and drop functionality. It didn’t take long to find out that there are a number of highly regarded drag and drop libraries for React but, after reading docs and reviews I decided that React-beautiful-dnd was going to fit my use case. In addition, it came boxed up with a very nice free tutorial course which you can find here. None of the…


Source — https://itsafriendlyworld.com/images/amatchmadeinheaven.png

Easily one of the most useful features of the GRANDstack’s integration with GraphQL is the ability to create and express directional relationships between nodes in your graph, or entities in your data. A simple example would be two friends, which you could express in your GraphQL Schema like:

type Person { name: String friends: [Person] @relation(name: "FRIEND", direction: "OUT) }

You can easily expand on this simple schema and add any amount of relationships that you desire like; favorite restaurants, hangouts, workplaces, family, etc. …


Easily one of the most useful features of the GRANDstack’s integration with GraphQL is the ability to create and express directional relationships between nodes in your graph, or entities in your data. A simple example would be two friends, which you could express in your GraphQL Schema like:

type Person { name: String friends: [Person] @relation(name: "FRIEND", direction: "OUT) }

You can easily expand on this simple schema and add any amount of relationships that you desire like; favorite restaurants, hangouts, workplaces, family, etc. …


https://grandstack.io/

Easily one of the hardest parts of starting any new project is choosing the technology stack you want to use. Even with very simple applications picking one technology over another can have long lasting implications for your project and make a major impact on workflow. So when your project is complicated, stack selection becomes that much more critical. Last year, while conceptualizing a project that would turn into my business, I despaired of ever being able to find a way to capture the complicated relationships and data requirements of my project.

What complications you might ask? My application is created…


The GRAND stack brought to you by the good folks at Neo4j and championed by William Lyon

Let me begin by saying that my introduction to databases was pretty rocky. At the time I encountered ORM and it’s assorted concepts I was working 60 plus hours a week, attending an online boot camp, and going to my local community college full time. Looking back on it, I may have bitten off more than I could chew. There were certainly areas that suffered because I wasn’t able to focus on them as much as I would have liked and databases, specifically SQL databases fall squarely in that category.

I can lay the blame on being busy but mostly…


I began working toward my goal of becoming a software developer since 2016. I’ve blogged about it off and on when I find the time and inspiration. My most popular effort has been my first, When Going it Alone Quit Working(Or How I Learned to Love Programming) and a year and a half after writing that post I’m happy to be able to say a few things:

One, that I’ve been a working software developer for almost a year.

Two, in addition to my day job, where I write mostly Python web scraping code, I’ve been able to teach myself…


Recently I’ve begun a mentorship program to become a better developer. In my day to day work, I focus mainly on Python but I like to try to keep my hand in other languages and so I spend time working on Express.js, Node.js, and React.js projects as well. I was in one of the first Udacity React Nanodegree classes and though I made it through the program and earned my Nanodegree, it was mostly because I worked my tail off and ground through the concepts. …


When I began to learn to code I was working as a lease operator or “Pumper”, for an oil and gas company. My job involved driving out to the middle of nowhere and checking on pumping units along with oil and gas batteries. I was basically a human computer, measuring the production of oil, gas, and produced water.

While I enjoyed the independent nature of the job and working outside it soon became very monotonous especially the amount of repetitive data entry that was required. At the same time as I was enrolled in college full time studying computer science…


Work that gets the bills paid….for now

Without laying out the details of my entire life and boring you to tears, it’s probably sufficient to say that I grew up in West Texas and knew that I wanted to leave as soon as I could. To that end, in 1998– a week after I walked the stage to receive my diploma– I stepped off a bus and onto the yellow footprints of Marine Recruit Depot San Diego. Fast forward to the end of 2012 and somehow I was back where I started.

Michael Porter

Digitized the oil fields of West Texas by learning to code. Entrepreneur, Coder, Graph Enthusiast www.muddybootscode.io

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store