By Dan Ziring and Alex Padmos

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Identifying patients who are eligible for clinical trials is one of the fundamental challenges the cancer research community faces. …


By Samantha Bail and Ovadia Harary

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In the first part of this blog post series, we talked about the main benefits of running internal company-wide hackathons. At Flatiron, we have found hackathons to be incredibly valuable both to our culture and to our business, as they encourage cross-functional collaboration, allow employees to stretch themselves, help with soft skills development and much more.

In this post, we’ll lay out some of the elements that have made our hackathons so successful, which we hope will be helpful for those looking to kick off their own!

The Structure

While there are certainly no hard and fast rules around what a good hackathon looks like, we’ve had success with a fairly lightweight two-day schedule. Generally, we plan for two full uninterrupted days of hacking, with our kick-off and closing activities on the preceding and proceeding days. These two days give teams just the right amount of time to deliver an output. …


By Samantha Bail & Ovadia Harary

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Hackathons have been a part of Flatiron Health since the company was founded in 2012. Our Chief Technology Officer (back then, Flatiron’s second engineer) Gil Shklarski brought the concept with him from his previous stint at Facebook. For Flatiron, our quarterly hackathons are meant to be two days free of meetings or sprint commitments for the whole company, where employees form teams to work or “hack” on something that they are passionate about, but just haven’t had the opportunity to work on. …

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