Today, on World Toilet Day, dare we say we’re flush with pride to share four of our favorite toilet tales? In the developing world, when we introduce toilets into a community, we’ve seen how lives are dramatically improved.

The World Health Organization reports that 2.3 billion people — one sixth of the world’s population — live without the dignity and safety of a toilet. Even schools and healthcare centers can suffer the lack of basic sanitation.

Imagine for a moment what your life would be like without a toilet. As a woman, you would be vulnerable to assault, simply because you need to relieve yourself at night. You would routinely suffer from sanitation-related illnesses because of unclean water — everything from chronic diarrhea to potential blindness. Got or want kids? They’re the most susceptible to disease.

But luckily…


There’s a great group of almost 60 mom bloggers who partner to make the world a better place for their kids… one American city at a time. They call themselves City Moms Blog Network, and they reach a combined monthly readership of 2 million people. They’ve decided to expand their reach to help Food for the Hungry (FH) end poverty through child sponsorship in Guatemala!

The network was founded in 2010 for the purpose of connecting moms in different communities throughout the country, through both online and offline events. …


My heart broken, I stood on a forested Ethiopian hillside and stared in dismay at the eroded and barren bluff on the other side of a ravine.

“I was here when this hillside looked like that,” my traveling companion said. Our guide, a farmer who lived at the bottom of the hill, told me that the forest that Food for the Hungry (FH) had helped plant brought back both rain and wild animals. “I grow more crops now,” he said.

That was my first trip overseas — a decade after the overwhelming famine that took more than 400,000 precious lives…


There were kids all over the world who watched their friends and neighbors walk to school today while they had to stay behind to help their family farm their land. There were kids who would have loved to go to school, but their families couldn’t afford the fees and tuition. There are kids who are walking great distances to a school without adequate supplies and bathrooms because a mediocre education and the mere chance to learn are far better than nothing. …


As a young adult, Anna Edgar lived in Peru, serving vulnerable communities with Food for the Hungry. When she returned to the United States and became Director of Missions and Outreach at Emmanuel Community Church (ECC) in Fort Wayne, Ind., she looked for ways to implement the principles she had learned overseas.

“Poverty is spiritual, physical, social and mental,” she explained. “It involves the whole person. We as a church needed to grow in this understanding.”

Edgar looked to Food for the Hungry to develop a partnership with the church. “Food for the Hungry is one of the unique organizations…


Teaching children to garden provides quality teaching time.

Once winter has fallen away and the ground has thawed, we make our way to the nurseries. To breathe in the newly budded plants lined up like little armies. And we dream. We dream of what our garden will look like this new year. Who is going to take care of what plant? Who is going to do the watering? And the children eagerly await the time when their flowers or vegetables will be ripe for display or dinners.

With the gardening season comes lessons in gentleness. These wee little seeds need tended to. We can’t just throw them onto…


A few years back, our family went through a season of sickness. It felt like we were on a rotation: My son would get sick, then me, then my husband. Right when I thought we were all better, someone would get sick again, and the rotation would start over.

We as a family just couldn’t catch a break.

These past few months in world affairs has felt a little like this, hasn’t it? We turn on the news or our computers, and there seems to always be coverage of yet another horrific and tragic event. Most recently, it’s been Paris…


This morning, when I woke up I took my daily medication with some filtered water I keep in a glass by my bed. I brewed a pot of coffee and hopped into the shower. At work, the cold water filter is merely two feet from my desk and I use it to fill my cup several times per day. I boil water to prepare meals for my family. I wash my dishes after dinner, I water my plants, I fill the cat’s water bowl everyday. I bathe my son, I wash my hands after I use the bathroom, and I…


The thing about poverty is that many of us assume it happens to “other” people. Poverty is not something we take into account when we are going to work, eating our meals or making life decisions. We largely live with the idea that once we are stable, our lives will stay that way. Sure, it could ebb and flow a bit, but for the most part, we assume that we will not slip under the poverty line.

But this assumption comes from a lack of adequate education on the cycles of poverty. How do people fall into poverty, and can’t…


As the granddaughter of a farmer, I spent many of my childhood summers “helping” my grandfather work his land. My sister and I rode on tractors, strengthened our hands learning to irrigate and walked behind Grandpa as he surveyed his rows of corn and beets. I’m proud that some of what farmer’s like my grandfather raise goes to help vulnerable people around the world, like where Food for the Hungry (FH) works in Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

What I enjoyed most about my farming days was helping Grandma with her vegetable garden. …

Food for the Hungry

Ending all forms of human poverty by graduating communities & walking with the most vulnerable people in Asia, Africa and Latin America since 1971.

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