You may be unintentionally making it hard to work with you; here’s how to fix that

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Photo: Ali Yahya

By Amy Blaschka

Every company has one: that colleague (or boss) who is hard to work with. You dread any interaction with them because they seem too self-absorbed, scattered, or guarded, and go to great lengths to avoid collaborating with them. Worse, they seem clueless that others perceive them this way.

There are always two ways of doing things: the easy way and the hard way. And your career will be far less taxing on you if you go out of your way to make it easy for others to work with you.

Here are five ways you’re making it hard to work with you (and how to fix…

If you’ve been thinking about quitting your full-time job and going full throttle with your side hustle, there’s never been a better time. But before you Zoom your boss to announce your last day, follow these three key action steps.

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Photo: Corinne Kutz

By Stephanie Burns

If you’ve been thinking about quitting your full-time job and going full throttle with your side hustle, there’s never been a better time. …

Mastering a powerful online presence helps you stand out from the competition

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Photo: LinkedIn Sales Navigator

By Sheila Callaham

In today’s remote working reality, an online presence can be a two-edged sword. Done right, and you own the space. Done haphazardly, and your professional persona could be doomed. If you are interviewing for a job in this competitive COVID-19 environment, mastering online presence is critical. If you are an older candidate, it is non-negotiable.

“The job search can leave us feeling especially vulnerable,” said Natalie Venturi, an executive presence coach. …

While employees have gone above and beyond during these difficult times, many describe feeling undervalued

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Photo: Anthony Da Cruz

By Caroline Castrillon

While employees in different fields have gone above and beyond during these difficult times, many describe feeling undervalued. A recent report by Workhuman found that 49% of those surveyed had not even received a “thank you” from their boss during the Covid-19 pandemic — a rather shocking statistic.

So, what can you do as an employee to remain energized? Fortunately, there are concrete steps you can take to stay motivated even when you feel unappreciated at work.

Do a reality check

First, take a step back and make a list of all your recent achievements. Was it over and above what your peers are doing? Then ask yourself whether your feelings are valid. Maybe you are valued but aren’t receiving as much feedback as you need. After all, with the pandemic, every employee is being stretched thin. Seek a second opinion from a mentor or colleague on whether the amount of appreciation you expect is realistic. …

Advice on how to be a better manager and promote your own career in a work-from-anywhere world

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Photo: Susanna Marsiglia

By Naomi Cahn

Last week’s good news about the Pfizer vaccine holds open the promise of going back to work in an actual office. But even after we’ve confirmed the success of the vaccine and figured out how it will be distributed, many of us will continue to work from home, at least part of the time. It turns out that we like working from home. A number of companies, including Google, will work to accommodate those of us who want to work from our living rooms (or anywhere else).

For leaders, and those who want to be leaders, working remotely gives us numerous benefits and also raises numerous challenges: 1) how do we manage our remote employees; and 2) how do we manage our own careers. As a Gallup report succinctly noted: Your remote workers’ productivity depends on one role — the manager.

Self-awareness is the new MBA

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Photo: Pablo García Saldaña

By Laura Garnett

Most of us love the idea of gaining a clearer understanding of who we are. We anticipate feedback with nervous excitement (or concern) because there’s often a question mark around what other people think about us.

But it turns out that awareness isn’t only useful for learning where we land in the social hierarchy. It’s also one of the key components to being the best you can be in all facets of your life. In fact, knowing who you are is critical when it comes to loving your work and being successful in your career.

There’s only one small issue. Digging into and figuring out who you truly are isn’t the easiest thing to do. It can be pretty difficult, actually. And you may be wondering, “Where do I even start?” …

Lack of experience in cash flow management can put new entrepreneurs at a disadvantage

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Photo: Christina @ wocintechchat.com

By YEC Expert Panel

Cash flow — the amount of money that comes in and goes out of a business — is often a concern for many new companies. Generating a healthy cash flow requires careful planning and a commitment to a strong operational strategy. However, a lack of experience in cash flow management as a new entrepreneur can put you at a disadvantage.

That’s why we asked 10 members of Young Entrepreneur Council about common cash-flow mistakes new business owners tend to make when they’re starting out. Here’s what they had to share from their experiences.

1. Not Counting Convertible Notes as Company Debt

If you are raising funding with convertible notes, be sure to remind yourself that they are technically company debt before being converted to equity, and the investors have the right to request repayment once the maturity date passes. Although it is uncommon for reputable investors to call the note, other founder friends have told me several horror stories where the company took serious damage after investors used the repayment right as unfair leverage in future negotiations with the founders. — Tinghui Zhou, Humen, Inc.

It is not merely this electoral win that validates Joe Biden’s success story. President or not, it is Biden’s resilience that positions him as a hope for young Americans with disabilities.

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Photo: Gayatri Malhotra

By Ali Shahbaz

“Joey, don’t let this define you. Joey, remember who you are. Joey, you can do it,” said Catherine Eugenia Biden to her young, stuttering son every time he would walk out. Little did she know that this young man would conquer more than just his speech disorder.

He would be slated to become the 46th President of the United States of America.

But it is not merely this electoral win that validates his success story. President or not, it is Joe Biden’s resilience that positions him as a hope for young Americans with disabilities.

According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, roughly 3M Americans stutter. Five to ten percent of all children will experience stuttering at some stage in their lives. The condition may persist, ranging from weeks to years. Nearly 25% of the children never outgrow stuttering. Research suggests that stuttering may acutely impact self-esteem, confidence, career potential and relationships. …

A common anti-immigration sentiment is that immigrants take jobs from locals, but new research highlights how this couldn’t be further from the truth, with immigrants more likely to create jobs than destroy them

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Photo: Ant Rozetsky

By Adi Gaskell

One of the more common arguments against immigration is that immigrants are said to take jobs from locals. If they don’t physically take jobs from them, the added workers in the labor market drive down wages, so natives get lower income as a result. However it plays out, immigrants are bad for the job prospects of locals. At least that’s the common narrative.

It’s an argument that while there is a certain logic to it, is not borne out by actual evidence. Indeed, research from the Kellogg School of Business highlights how areas with more immigration have actually seen higher gains in per-capita income. The researchers wanted to test whether previous research into the topic had focused too much on the role of immigrants as workers as opposed to entrepreneurs, who might create new businesses that end up employing many people. …

Many authors spend a lot of time investigating how to publish their book. Here’s a quick crash course in how self-publishing and commercial publishing differ.

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Photo: Jonas Jacobsson

By Elaine Pofeldt

As a ghostwriter, I often hear from prospective authors who would like to write a book but are on the fence about whether to self-publish it or try to find a commercial publisher. Many of these budding writers are entrepreneurs — whether solo professionals or founders of scalable companies — who want to raise the profile of their business to bring in more clients or speaking engagements, or who want to establish themselves as thought leaders.

These days, this is a tougher choice than it was in the days of “vanity” publishing houses. Self-publishing has come a long way since then, and you can earn money and build your reputation with both types of publishing. However, the experience of commercially publishing versus self-publishing is very different. It’s important to have a general sense of how they differ before you start your book, because commercial publishing requires some extra steps up front. …

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