Parental alienation is REAL, for the children

A child, who is close to and comfortable with her father, answers his phone call at her mother’s home, and in a lowered, nervous voice says she does not want to speak with him, though they have been together only recently and have had a great time.

Why?

A child spends a wonderful time among several members of his father’s family for several days, and then no one in that family hears from him for years afterward. Birthday and holiday greetings and gifts are sent back, his mother changes her telephone number and email address, multiple efforts to contact him are unsuccessful.

Why?

Two siblings, a brother and sister, have spent only limited time together but have begun to feel comfortable with each other, even though they have different mothers and are growing up in different households. Never once does it occur to either mother, to contact the other, simply to facilitate the two children remaining in contact.

Why?

These true stories, and millions of others like them, have occurred in children’s lives for far too long. The concept of parental alienation has only in recent years begun to be treated (cautiously) as a serious topic at all, amid much ridicule as “junk science” and even accusations that the mere mention of the effects on children having been separated from a parent, are only a fabricated cover to conceal the abusive actions of the parent raising these concerns for children.

Why?

For the first six years (1994–2000) of the Violence Against Women Act’s nationwide programs and widespread influence on custody matters, funded by the United States Department of Justice, its statutory language that named the mere mention of the term “parental alienation” as in itself “evidence of abuse” was taken as the guiding response to any raising of the effects on children at all.

Why?

Though the clause was quietly removed from the 2000 re-authorization of the act, this mindset has remained alive and well, that parents concerned over their children’s alienated behavior toward a separated parent are only lying abusers, playing the system for more access to continue alleged abuses that never have to be proven in the first place.

Why?

An organization calling itself the “Stop Abuse Campaign” makes the outrageous allegation, that fathers seeking by any means to remain in our children’s lives are by default abusive liars, its front-and-center claim. This organization has access to congressional committees, bar associations, judicial organizations and many other venues in the policy arena, and pitches this vicious narrative condemning alienated fathers as a class, wherever its message is heard.

Why?

A search for charitable resources to help alienated parents re-unite with their children, will yield ZERO resources to aid directly, one family at a time, in the simple aim of getting parents and children back into contact after months and years of separation and silence.

Why?

This all goes on in full public view, nearly anyone who knows or works with children is familiar with at least one instance of an absent, alienated, discredited, outcast parent, and yet the topic is treated as taboo, as a breach of etiquette, with a universal disclaimer of “I don’t want to get involved”.

Why?

What has any of these children ever done, to deserve being cut off from members of their own families, not only parents but siblings, grandparents, cousins, aunts and uncles, just on the unilateral say-so of one parent who ties them to only one half of their real family?

WHY?

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