No, we don’t, and that’s cool.
Meg
31

You of all people might grasp an analogy I was using to explain my motives in onlinery to someone else recently: it is a sort of hunt. For people who are reasonable, balanced, articulate, assertive, who stand their ground well, who give ground with grace, who prevail sportingly and without guile or spite; in short, people capable of adult conversation, because this rare and endangered resource may well be the thing that saves civilization from itself, one well-founded association at a time. And a very hard thing to find.

The quarry is elusive, rare, woods-wise and sometimes leaves the subtlest of sign to follow. One must learn to read the sign, respect the habitat, obey the rules of approach, or one will never spot the game at all.

Added to the narrative from my last post, is the ethos that the hunt has little to do with what one intends to do once the game is found. Finding it, is the hunt, not killing it, or photographing it, or ear-tagging or radio-collaring it, what have you. One must lug along all the tools needed to meet those objectives whether the hunt is ever a success or not, or one is unprepared to meet the hunt’s objective, if one hasn’t a clue how to conduct it in the first place.

And, you and I both know just how triggered (pun maybe intended?) so many readers will be by such an analogy: thoughts of “predator, power and control, stalker” etc, having been well-implanted in their stunted interactive skill sets. And to that I say: good. Because they aren’t who I want to talk to anyway.

You are.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.