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The other day after a very productive meeting about AdultADHD, cofounder Alex emerged from the toilet looking mightily annoyed with herself. In a moment of carefree relaxedness Alex dropped her phone in the loo. We were all extremely sympathetic. I think we understood how easily that could happen to anyone. How especially easily it could happen to an adult with ADHD. It’s one of the most frustrating things about our disorder. Always at the most carefree of moments some article of clumsiness or forgetfulness or impulsivity will drop us quite literally in the shit. …


The following is my opinion. I am not an academic. I’m just a person with ADHD. There is an ocean of research about ADHD out there. I suggest you dive into it before relying on the word of any single individual. That said…

Alex approached me to do this blog and I thought it was a great idea. After all, the main reason we set up this project was to educate people about ADHD. A huge part of that must involve challenging misconceptions. There are some nasty ones out there. In fact, ADHD has been riddled with controversy since at least the 1970s. It has been at the centre of raging debate and consequently those with the disorder have been stigmatized and side-lined as other parties fought to decide whether they believed it was real, or whether medicating with stimulants was ethical, or whether ADHD was actually caused by declining standards of parental strictness, video games or sugary foods. …


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Photo by Aron Visuals on Unsplash

Generalisations, this piece is full of them and I can only apologise if I represent your group in a way that excludes you. I have no medical degree and the following can only represent my opinions, for what they are worth.

For all its faults, it is my experience that ADHD is handy in moments of crisis. At such times there is nothing to bear in mind or to forget to remember. There is only the situation right now, and how you respond to it. People with ADHD are great in such scenarios because they are largely incapable of doing anything other than thinking in the moment. Further to this, people with ADHD are very used to crisis. We are all so often late with deadlines, appointments and bills that we carry a sense of urgency with us throughout life, wearing it like a second skin. I have made a conscious effort in recent months to curtail my “battle stations” response to things because it is stressful and alarming for the people around me. I don’t mind intensity in dealing with problems. I’m very used to it, but most problems do not require intensity. …


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It is impossible to raise a human without making any mistakes along the way, without leaving just a smidge of unresolved trauma to spice up your early twenties before the real adult shit hits you. Even if it were feasible, I doubt you’d find such an example among the ADHD community. After all, to my knowledge, ADHD is hereditary. Chances are at least one of your parents was dealing with some the traits which mark your ADHD as a disorder and they didn’t have the benefit of a diagnosis. …


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In early September 2010 I was a bony 19 year old. I identified entirely by my ability to play the guitar and I had long diagnosed and medicated but little understood ADHD. One rainy evening, in an effort to hide the fact I had started smoking from my family, I went on a walk around the streets by our house. I was brutally knocked down by a speeding, spinning, silver Renault Clio. It hit me on the pavement at roughly 40mph so the police said, apparently working it out from where I ended up wrapped around an iron gate. On my way I took out a hedge and a knee-high drystone wall. …

Francis Waters

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