Steve Jobs — A dialogue driven, three act epic.

Very Mild Spoilers

You have to like Danny Boyle, Aaron Sorkin, or Steve Jobs to enjoy this film. To be fair, all three are masters of their craft but aren’t the right flavor for some people. The mainstream audience is not going to enjoy this movie or appreciate it’s subtleties but it truly is a masterpiece. It’s a shame it will probably be considered a bomb when all is said and done.

I’ve grown to love Danny Boyle for three reasons. His style is unpredictable but always interesting, his shots are visually remarkable, and he appreciates good typography. Danny’s format for this movie is what makes it excel. The entire movie takes place in three acts, each at one of Jobs’ major product releases. It’s a brilliant way to structure the Steve Jobs story if you can accept the artistic liberties taken and feels a little inspired by Birdman.

The other highlight of Steve Jobs is the screenplay. In true Sorkin fashion, every few minutes there is a great line that makes you smirk, chuckle, or gasp. The writing was probably the best part of the movie and makes you wish real life was scripted in the same vein as what goes through Aaron Sorkin’s head.

My favorite scene is a treat for anyone involved in product development or design. It depicts a five year old girl using a Macintosh, or more specifically a GUI for the first time. Even a fictional recollection of someone using a mouse and pointer for the first time is so compelling to watch, especially told through they eyes of Danny Boyle and the performance of Michael Fassbender.

Speaking of Fassebender, as of right now I can’t think of anyone in better position to take Best Actor although I’m sure the perennial runner up, better known as Leonardo DiCaprio, will give him a run for his money once The Revenant is released.

While this movie isn’t for everyone, if you can enjoy a dialogue heavy movie driven by great acting and powerful storytelling, go see it.

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