SOUND ADVICE

Many drummers are great technicians, but lack a sense of feel, soul, and environmental awareness [LIVE PERFORMANCE VS. RECORDING].

FEEL relates to many aspects of drumming; soft attack, hard attack, accents, a sense to let the music breathe [rests adding to the dynamic of the music]. There are also accents for emphasizing a break, or playing softer to let the vocal, or instrument to take front and center.

Before getting into the subject of LIVE PERFORMANCE vs. RECORDING, I’d like to explain the simple [but essential] process of selecting the right drumstick. First and foremost : BALANCE…..Roll the sticks on a level glass surface. No wobble; the sticks are BALANCED.

Sometimes there is a slight discrepancy in the weight of the pair of sticks. I choose the lighter stick [of the two] for my right hand [the motor/time].

TIP: WARM UP WITH HEAVY STICKS [MARCHING BAND STICKS]. WHEN YOU SWITCH TO YOUR PERFORMANCE STICKS THEY WILL FEEL LIGHTER; WHICH INCREASES YOUR SPEED; AS WELL AS YOUR STAMINA.

RECORDING VS. LIVE PERFORMANCE.

These two different musical environments require two different mindsets; as well as two different physical approaches. LIVE PERFORMANCE lends itself to a BALLS-OUT APPROACH. The RECORDING ENVIRONMENT is diametrically opposite to LIVE PERFORMANCE. The RECORDING ENVIRONMENT demands restraint; without sacrificing spontaneity. Once a piece of music is recorded you have to live with that particular take for eternity. RECORDING is a mechanical form. LIVE PERFORMANCE is a expressive form, created through emotion, and audience stimulation. Minor flubs are not detected in a LIVE PERFORMANCE. In a RECORDING ENVIRONMENT the minor flubs are a permanent record.

A drummer should practice a piece of music to be recorded sufficiently before entering into the studio.

A WORD OF CAUTION: Do not hold back on emotional expression [while recording] for the sake of an acceptable take. Be technically sound while simultaneously expressing yourself creatively.

HAPPY STICKING……….

LOUIS PAUL SELLARI

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