10 Absurd Differences Between Romania and Germany That Made Me Laugh/Cry

Day 208/365: Number 8 is my favourite!

Ravensburg, Germany — Photo by Gabriel Iosa
  1. There are no flies or other insects — I can’t grasp my head around this one. It was the first thing that baffled me. It happens because everybody respects some procedures in which they are legally obliged to maintain their farms away from cities and never leave their animals in pools of urine and other stuff. In Romania, cows and horses leave with people, walk on the streets and don’t mind taking huge craps in the middle of them.
  2. The drivers are all following the law — Every single driver in Germany follows the traffic laws. There’s no overtaking in Germany. There’s no traffic stress. There’s not even honking. I heard no honking in 10 days. Regardless of the car you’re driving, you are on the road so you need to respect the laws and the drivers that drive alongside you.
  3. The public transport is flawless — It still baffles me how a small country town like Ravensburg has such a great public transport system. It connects not only the boroughs with the central part of town, but also with the adjacent villages around it. The busses come and go exactly at the time you’d expect them to do so. They are all modern, air-conditioned and the monthly subscription fee of 45 Euros is more than fine.
  4. The people are all smiling — It matters less for the Germans if they’re having a good day or not. The environment is enough for them to smile all the time. Why wouldn’t they? They have everything they need for a good life, infrastructure, reasonable prices for their income, transport, everything. Smiling is normal in Germany, even if Germans are not the first that come to mind when you think about happiness.
  5. There are no unguarded road works or any other types of constructions — In Romania, there are countless cases of people getting injured or even killed because of badly guarded works. People falling into opened holes in the road or having pieces of construction work falling onto their heads. In Germany, constructions are clearly marked and it’s almost impossible for people to get hurt because of them.
  6. The money has a lot of value — You can buy a lot of food for 100 Euros in Germany. In Romania, for 100 lei you get some bread, a piece of meat and some fruits and you get home wandering about how’d you spent all that cash. Money is valuable in Germany and, although you work hard for it, it’s rewarding to be able to have faith in your money.
  7. Everything is clean and tight — The grass is cut to perfection. The streets are clean and smell nice. If it weren’t for the cigarette stumps, the streets would be absolutely spotless. Houses and apartment buildings are cleaned obsessively. I like that kind of obsessive behaviour.
  8. Nobody shouts, nobody is angry, nobody does crazy shit — You don’t get to listen to your neighbour shouting at 3 AM for no reason. You don’t get to hear crazy motorcycle raves at 4 AM. You don’t see angry people on the streets. People are angry in Germany too, but they somehow manage to get over it and move on, and the surroundings clearly have to do something with it. Nobody complains about diseases in Germany. In Romania, I listened to two ladies talk for 1 and a half hour on a train yesterday about nothing but diseases and hospitals. People are calmer, which makes them healthier and more resilient to sickness. In the end, you are what you talk about.
  9. Everybody pays their taxes — There’s no messing around in Germany. In Romania, paying your taxes is a hard process which mostly gets forgotten by companies or small businesses owners. The online system we have here is a joke, and the state wants about 50% of your income. In Germany, although the taxes are high, you can pay them online in the blink of an eye. There’s little to no paperwork, and the money the state gets from you is put into developing the country. And you can actually see it happening!
  10. The food is mediocre — If there’s one thing I didn’t like about Germany, that would be the food. I had a hard time living without soup. Of course, we made some at home, but eating out there’s basically no soups on the menus of restaurants. There’s no soup culture in Germany, which makes me think how on Earth are these people living without soups and liquid foods, but constantly eat fried stuff like there’s no tomorrow. I liked eating meat and fried stuff, don’t get me wrong, I just don’t see it as a sustainable diet. Pizza and kebabs are also on everyone’s menus.

Thank you for your time!

Click HERE if you want the best writing piece for you and your business!

Click HERE to buy my book on how I made it as a freelancer with nothing to begin with but a crappy laptop and about a year on a dead platform!

Follow me @gabrieliosa on Instagram and give this post exactly 44 claps!

I’m on a mission to write 365 articles in 2018. This is definitely the biggest writing challenge of my life so far. If you’d like to be part of the journey, please follow me here on Medium.com for the daily posts!

365 Days Writing Challenge: -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207