The missing CI/CD Kubernetes component: Helm package manager

Gajus Kuizinas
Jan 5, 2017 · 11 min read

The past two months I have been actively migrating all my services from dedicated servers to Kubernetes cluster. I have done the containerisation of the existing applications and have written the Kubernetes manifests. However, I was missing a way to configure, release, version, rollback and inspect the deployments. This is when I have discovered Helm.

Lets keep things simple.

Key definitions:

  • Helm is a chart manager.
  • Charts are packages of pre-configured Kubernetes resources.
  • Release is a collection of Kubernetes resources deployed to the cluster using Helm.

Helm is used to:

  • Make configurable releases
  • Upgrade, delete, inspect releases made using Helm

Helm is made of two components:

  • helm client. Used to create, fetch, search and validate charts and to instruct tiller.
  • tiller server. Runs inside the Kubernetes cluster and manages the releases.

Install Helm

macOS users can install Helm client using Homebrew.

brew install kubernetes-helm

Use helm client to deploy tiller to the Kubernetes cluster:

helm init uses the ~/.kube/config configuration to connect to the Kubernetes cluster. Ensure that your configuration is referencing a cluster that is safe to make test deployments.

helm init

Instructions for other platforms, refer to https://github.com/kubernetes/helm/blob/master/docs/quickstart.md.

Define a Chart

Helm documentation includes a succinct guide to defining Helm charts. I recommend reading the guide in full. However, I will guide you through a “Hello, World!” example.

A chart is organized as a collection of files inside of a directory. The directory name is the name of the chart.

$ mkdir ./hello-world
$ cd ./hello-world

A chart must include a chart definition file, Chart.yaml . Chart definition file must define two properties: name and version (Semantic Versioning 2).

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./Chart.yaml
name: hello-world
version: 1.0.0
EOF

A chart must define templates used to generate Kubernetes manifests, e.g.

$ mkdir ./templates
$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: hello-world
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
app: hello-world
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello:1.0
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
EOF
$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/service.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
name: hello-world
spec:
type: NodePort
ports:
- port: 8080
targetPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
selector:
app: hello-world
EOF

That is all thats required to make a release.

Release, list, inspect, delete, rollback, purge

Use helm install RELATIVE_PATH_TO_CHART to make a release.

$ helm install .
NAME: cautious-shrimp
LAST DEPLOYED: Thu Jan 5 11:32:04 2017
NAMESPACE: default
STATUS: DEPLOYED
RESOURCES:
==> v1/Service
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
hello-world 10.0.0.175 <nodes> 8080:31419/TCP 0s
==> extensions/Deployment
NAME DESIRED CURRENT UP-TO-DATE AVAILABLE AGE
hello-world 1 1 1 0 0s

helm install . used Kubernetes manifests in ./templates directory to create a deployment and a service:

$ kubectl get po,svc
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
po/hello-world-52480365-gntxz 1/1 Running 0 1m
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
svc/hello-world 10.0.0.175 <nodes> 8080/TCP 1m
svc/kubernetes 10.0.0.1 <none> 443/TCP 6d

Use helm ls to list deployed releases:

$ helm ls
NAME REVISION UPDATED STATUS CHART
cautious-shrimp 1 Thu Jan 5 11:32:04 2017 DEPLOYED hello-world-1.0.0

Use helm status RELEASE_NAME to inspect a particular release:

$ helm status cautious-shrimp
LAST DEPLOYED: Thu Jan 5 11:32:04 2017
NAMESPACE: default
STATUS: DEPLOYED
RESOURCES:
==> v1/Service
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
hello-world 10.0.0.175 <nodes> 8080:31419/TCP 6m
==> extensions/Deployment
NAME DESIRED CURRENT UP-TO-DATE AVAILABLE AGE
hello-world 1 1 1 1 6m

Use helm delete RELEASE_NAME to remove all Kubernetes resources associated with the release:

$ helm delete cautious-shrimp

Use helm ls --deleted to list deleted releases:

helm ls --deleted
NAME REVISION UPDATED STATUS CHART
cautious-shrimp 1 Thu Jan 5 11:32:04 2017 DELETED hello-world-1.0.0

Use helm rollback RELEASE_NAME REVISION_NUMBER to restore a deleted release:

$ helm rollback cautious-shrimp 1
Rollback was a success! Happy Helming!
$ helm ls
NAME REVISION UPDATED STATUS CHART
cautious-shrimp 2 Thu Jan 5 11:47:57 2017 DEPLOYED hello-world-1.0.0
$ helm status cautious-shrimp
LAST DEPLOYED: Thu Jan 5 11:47:57 2017
NAMESPACE: default
STATUS: DEPLOYED
RESOURCES:
==> v1/Service
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
hello-world 10.0.0.42 <nodes> 8080:32367/TCP 2m
==> extensions/Deployment
NAME DESIRED CURRENT UP-TO-DATE AVAILABLE AGE
hello-world 1 1 1 1 2m

Use helm delete --purge RELEASE_NAME to remove all Kubernetes resources associated with with the release and all records about the release from the store.

$ helm delete --purge cautious-shrimp
$ helm ls --deleted

That was truly satisfying!

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A clean release, inspection, removal, rollback and purge.

Configuring releases

I have shown you how to manage a life cycle of a Helm release. That was cool. However, that is not even the reason why I started looking into Helm: I needed a tool to configure releases.

Helm Chart templates are written in the Go template language, with the addition of 50 or so add-on template functions from the Sprig library and a few other specialized functions.

Values for the templates are supplied using values.yaml file, e.g.

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./values.yaml
image:
repository: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello
tag: '1.0'
EOF

A generic warning about YAML configuration. Be careful to quote numeric values, e.g. if in the above example I have written tag: 1.0 (without quotes) it would have been interpreted as a number, i.e. 1 .

Values that are supplied via a values.yaml file are accessible from the .Values object in a template.

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: hello-world
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
app: hello-world
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: {{ .Values.image.repository }}:{{ .Values.image.tag }}
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
EOF

Values in the values.yaml can be overwritten at the time of making the release using --values YAML_FILE_PATH or --set key1=value1,key2=value2 parameters, e.g.

$ helm install --set image.tag='latest' .

Values provided using --values parameter are merged with values defined in values.yaml file and values provided using --set parameter are merged with the resulting values, i.e. --set overwrites provided values of --value, --value overwrites provided values of values.yaml .

Debugging

Using templates to generate the manifests require to be able to preview the result. Use --dry-run --debug options to print the values and the resulting manifests without deploying the release:

$ helm install . --dry-run --debug --set image.tag=latest
Created tunnel using local port: '49636'
SERVER: "localhost:49636"
CHART PATH: /Users/gajus/Documents/dev/gajus/hello-world
NAME: eyewitness-turkey
REVISION: 1
RELEASED: Thu Jan 5 13:02:49 2017
CHART: hello-world-1.0.0
USER-SUPPLIED VALUES:
image:
tag: latest
COMPUTED VALUES:
image:
repository: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello
tag: latest
HOOKS:
MANIFEST:
---
# Source: hello-world/templates/service.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
name: hello-world
spec:
type: NodePort
ports:
- port: 8080
targetPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
selector:
app: hello-world
---
# Source: hello-world/templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: hello-world
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
app: hello-world
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello:latest
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP

Using predefined values

In addition to user supplied values, there is a number of predefined values:

  • .Release is used to refer to the resulting release values, e.g. .Release.Name, .Release.Time .
  • .Chart is used to refer to the Chart.yaml configuration.
  • .Files is used to refer to the files in the chart directory.

I am using the predefined values to create labels that enable inspection of the Kubernetes resources:

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
labels:
app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
version: {{ .Chart.Version }}
release: {{ .Release.Name }}
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
version: {{ .Chart.Version }}
release: {{ .Release.Name }}
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: {{ .Values.image.repository }}:{{ .Values.image.tag }}
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
EOF
$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/service.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
name: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
labels:
app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
version: {{ .Chart.Version }}
release: {{ .Release.Name }}
spec:
type: NodePort
ports:
- port: 8080
targetPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
selector:
app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
EOF

Note, that it is your responsibility to ensure that all resources have a unique name and labels. In the above example, I am using .Release.Name and .Chart.Name to create a resource name.

{{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}

Note: Kubernetes resource labels and names are restricted to 63 characters. http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/labels/#syntax-and-character-set

Partials

You have probably noticed a repeating pattern in the templates:

app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
version: {{ .Chart.Version }}
release: {{ .Release.Name }}

We are using the same labels for all resources.

Furthermore, our resource name is a lengthy expression:

{{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}

This repetition becomes even more apparent in large applications, with dozens of different resources. Lets see what we can do about it.

Lets create a _helpers.tpl file and use it to declare partials that we can later import into the templates:

Files in ./templates directory that start with _ are not considered Kubernetes manifests. The rendered version of these files are not sent to Kubernetes.

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/_helpers.tpl
{{- define "hello-world.release_labels" }}
app: {{ printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 }}
version: {{ .Chart.Version }}
release: {{ .Release.Name }}
{{- end }}
{{- define "hello-world.full_name" -}}
{{- printf "%s-%s" .Release.Name .Chart.Name | trunc 63 -}}
{{- end -}}
EOF

Now we have two partials: hello-world.release_labels and hello-world.full_name that we can use in the templates:

Template names are global. Because templates in subcharts are compiled together with top-level templates, you should be careful to name your templates with chart-specific names. This is the reason I am using Chart name to prefix template names.

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 8 }}
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: {{ .Values.image.repository }}:{{ .Values.image.tag }}
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
EOF
$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/service.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
spec:
type: NodePort
ports:
- port: 8080
targetPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
selector:
app: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
EOF

Notice that I sometimes use template and sometimes include to include a partial. Read the named templates guide to learn the difference.

One last time, lets print the resulting manifest:

$ helm install . --dry-run --debug
Created tunnel using local port: '50655'
SERVER: "localhost:50655"
CHART PATH: /Users/gajus/Documents/dev/gajus/hello-world
NAME: kindred-deer
REVISION: 1
RELEASED: Thu Jan 5 14:46:41 2017
CHART: hello-world-1.0.0
USER-SUPPLIED VALUES:
{}
COMPUTED VALUES:
image:
repository: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello
tag: "1.0"
HOOKS:
MANIFEST:
---
# Source: hello-world/templates/service.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
name: kindred-deer-hello-world
labels:
app: kindred-deer-hello-world
version: 1.0.0
release: kindred-deer
spec:
type: NodePort
ports:
- port: 8080
targetPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
selector:
app: kindred-deer-hello-world
---
# Source: hello-world/templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: kindred-deer-hello-world
labels:
app: kindred-deer-hello-world
version: 1.0.0
release: kindred-deer
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
app: kindred-deer-hello-world
version: 1.0.0
release: kindred-deer
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: gcr.io/google-samples/node-hello:1.0
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP

Isn’t this awesome?

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I see you are going nuts!

Bonus round: generating a checksum

Have you noticed that I am using separate files for deployment and service resource definition? Helm does not require this. However, there is a good reason for keeping definitions separate.

Consider a scenario: You have a ConfigMap resource that controls behaviour of your deployment, e.g.

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/config-map.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
data:
magic-number: '11'
EOF
$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 8 }}
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: {{ .Values.image.repository }}:{{ .Values.image.tag }}
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
env:
- name: MAGIC_NUMBER
valueFrom:
configMapKeyRef:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
key: magic-number
EOF
$ helm install . --name demo
$ kubectl get po,svc,cm -l app=demo-hello-world
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
po/demo-hello-world-2159237003-fr5gk 1/1 Running 0 8s
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
svc/demo-hello-world 10.0.0.68 <nodes> 8080/TCP 8s
NAME DATA AGE
cm/demo-hello-world 1 8s

You’ve made a release.

Now magic-number has changed. You update the config-map.yaml and make a new release:

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/config-map.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
data:
magic-number: '12'
EOF
$ helm upgrade demo .

Notice that ConfigMap resource has been recreated but Deployment has not been recreated.

$ kubectl get po,svc,cm -l app=demo-hello-world
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
po/demo-hello-world-2159237003-fr5gk 1/1 Running 0 1m
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
svc/demo-hello-world 10.0.0.68 <nodes> 8080/TCP 1m
NAME DATA AGE
cm/demo-hello-world 1 1m

This is because nothing in the deployment.yaml has changed.

However, we can use include function to include the contents of the config-map.yaml and sha256sum to create SHA256 checksum.

{{ include (print $.Chart.Name "/templates/config-map.yaml") . | sha256sum }}

We can use this value to generate an annotation for the deployment:

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/deployment.yaml
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
spec:
replicas: 1
template:
metadata:
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 8 }}
annotations:
checksum/config-map: {{ include (print $.Chart.Name "/templates/config-map.yaml") . | sha256sum }}
spec:
containers:
- name: hello-world
image: {{ .Values.image.repository }}:{{ .Values.image.tag }}
ports:
- containerPort: 8080
protocol: TCP
env:
- name: MAGIC_NUMBER
valueFrom:
configMapKeyRef:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
key: magic-number
EOF

Now, we change magic-number value again and upgrade the release:

$ cat <<'EOF' > ./templates/config-map.yaml
apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
name: {{ template "hello-world.full_name" . }}
labels:
{{- include "hello-world.release_labels" . | indent 4 }}
data:
magic-number: '13'
EOF
$ helm upgrade demo .
$ kubectl get po,svc,cm -l app=demo-hello-world
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
po/demo-hello-world-2130866520-l77rf 1/1 Terminating 0 58s
po/demo-hello-world-3814420630-jrglp 0/1 ContainerCreating 0 2s
NAME CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
svc/demo-hello-world 10.0.0.68 <nodes> 8080/TCP 4m
NAME DATA AGE
cm/demo-hello-world 1 4m

The checksum has changed, the release annotation has changed, and therefore the associated pods have been recreated.

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We have a liftoff!

My use case for Helm has been to abstract configuration and deployments in the CI/CD pipeline. However, I have learned along the way that Helm is much more versatile tool. I have not even touched on the aspect of using Helm to declare dependencies and setup Chart repositories. Therefore, I encourage the reader to continue exploring Helm by going through the documentation.

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