givenness and liminality

‘[A]ll life is given and must continue to be given to be true to its nature.’*

‘[T]he vast changes required by a regenerative society will not be achieved just by reacting to crises after they arrive. They will require inspiration, aspiration, imagination, patience, perseverance, and no small amount of humility.’**

Givenness is something we all can develop.

Some are more expressive in their givenness than others, but none of us know the limits of our capacity to give. The question is more about how much more we can daily give in hundreds of ways, rather than some big once-in-a-lifetime way.

Our willingness to pursue givenness takes us into unknown, unfamiliar, and challenging places which lie between or uponon the far side of what we normally know and fill our days with. These are preparing spaces, places of previously unknown knowledge and invisible energy becoming available to us — like the wilderness for Jesus or Dagobah for Luke Skywalker. They are places of challenge to be alive.

“He not busy being born is busy dying.”^

We accept our givenness by beginning, overcoming, giving it on, again and again.

(*From Eugene Peterson’s Run with the Horses.)
(**From Peter Senge’s The Necessary Revolution.)
(^Bob Dylan, quoted in Jonah Lehrer’s
Proust was a Neuroscientist.)