Intel’s next big thing is small. My take on the Intel Compute Stick

I saw this amazing deal of Lazada for the Intel Compute Stick and read a couple of reviews and felt it was safe and gave it a go. It arrived to my place in 2 days time. It carried a very familiar packaging. It reminded me of the Nokia packing when they carried the Lumia brand.

I am a huge fan of trying out new things and felt Intel had something truly innovative to offer. I have seen a fair share of how Android boxes and how terrible they work but for some reason with the recent product announcements from Intel I felt they were up to something.

Courtesy Yugatech

The unboxing experience was standard but I noticed there was a fair share of cables and powerplug connectors just in case you needed them. All you really need were these:

1. Intel Compute Stick

2. Micro-USB cable

3. Power Adapter

Booting up

Standard Windows 8.1 experience with the signing in to Outlook. It was a vanilla experience and I like that. I thank Intel for not tinkering the experience unlike some Android OEMs out there. (I am talking to you Samsung!)

Starting out

Initially I looked at my desktop and felt what is so different? I worked on it, installed Chrome. Updated my Windows 8.1 and still felt normal. Then I realised it was all being powered from a tiny stick!

What kind of sorcery is this?! This was a no holds bar fill blown Windows monster created by Intel. Insane!

Of course, common sense tells me it is definitely not for a power user who does video rendering but I can imagine running my office and business on it with ease. For crying out loud, it changed my LCD panel which was lying around into a freakin’ intelligent beast.

Ending well

I am now in the process of getting Windows 10 installed and I believe it should go well since the prerequisite for installing it is pretty low.

Overall, I am super impressed by this and I in fact raved about it to a couple of my friends. With the advent of Raspberry Pi and other new-gen-low powered computers, I do believe this where the future of consumer computing lies especially making it easily accessible, affordable and equally powerful.


Originally published at georgeiswrite.com on December 4, 2015.