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Source: iStock. Own edits.

An apolitical solution to the pandemic by a small European biotech.

Originally published in WORTH.

It is every nation for itself in the global race for a vaccine, as countries hurry to secure a drug for their populations. President Donald Trump’s attempts to buy German CureVac earlier in March during the peak of the pandemic led Angela Merkel and her cabinet of ministers to discuss German defense strategy for the firm. Undeterred, Trump’s administration is giving out billions to produce not-yet-finished vaccines, while in Russian President Vladimir Putin declared triumphantly in August that his country had produced the world’s first coronavirus vaccine. (Technically, China was first, but you get the picture.)

Russia managed to get to the finish line first by omitting widespread testing of the vaccine. Renamed Sputnik V, the vaccine was approved before Phase 3 trials even began. …


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Source: Library.org (own edits)

A version of this article was published in the World Economic Forum.

Few know that perhaps the single most important factor that enabled the growth of globalization was a very practical thing — the invention of a container.


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Source: Mental Floss.

…not as surprising as you’d like to think.

It is fun observing America from afar. I live in Europe, but I have all my wealth in U.S. stocks, and so everyday I am glued to cnbc’s and bloomberg’s market reporting — the showbiz of overhyped ups-and-downs. It feels like watching earth from future. Europe is much calmer, laid back, as if the virus passed already.

I also cannot help but think that America is embarrassed by the coronavirus. …


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Source: Forbes. (own edits)

Reflections on Marc Andreessen’s widely popular essay.

Marc Andreessen’s latest essay It’s Time To Build reads like a manifesto of a youth political club, but it sure struck a chord with a lot of Americans. “We chose not to build,” is the mantra of Andreessen’s article, calling out Western world’s bluff — its unpreparedness for the virus outbreak. In the time of crisis, we don’t have things to fall back on — the ventilators, tests, ICUs — because instead of building things, we offshore all the hard stuff, living comfortable light lives.

For Andreessen, the issue isn’t money, it’s our “smug complacency.” He looks for issues in the “inert” unwillingness, while completely ignoring the issue of money. Surely, though, his ‘supermodern cities, highly automated factories, hyperloop(s) and flying cars’ must cost something? Who will pay for their creation? …


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Source: St. Margaret’s College. (own edits)

How VCs may have to change after the virus is over.

Marc Andreessen sure knows how to make headlines. His latest article It’s Time To Build really hit a nerve with the virus struck America. It says exactly what you’d expect it to: we (the Americans and the West more generally) should start building and creating again. …


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Source: cnbc. (own edits)

The narrative risk for half-Chinese companies is growing.

Originally published in The Worth.

Eric S. Yuan, the 49 years old founder and CEO of Zoom grasped the situation he has found himself in rather well when, overnight, he issued a public apology and announced a U-turn in the company’s strategy from feature development to security, after a series of investigative reports, tweets and blog posts exposed Zoom’s security lapses.


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Source: ft. (own edits)

Paul Singer may have just found his most formidable opponent.

Despite what you might think from reading about Elliott’s move to oust the yoga-loving half-time Twitter CEO, Jack Dorsey, the truth is that Paul Singer may have just found his most formidable enemy.


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Source: architecturepeople.com

The return to the analog world.

The small metal box made a beeping sound after he touched it with his parking card . The barrier went slowly up and David stepped on gas and the black Audi sedan slowly drove between narrow curbs of the underground parking driveway. He was careful; he had wide wheels on the car and he scratched them here a few times before.


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Source: Kuba Bozanowski.

This is why U.S. can print its way out of any crisis.

In 2016, I wrote in Forbes why Twitter should better change to become a public good — a paid announcement tool of sorts for the prominent only. The question I tried to answer was simple: is Twitter’s user base (and hence revenue line) inherently limited to affluent people with some form of a media exposure and a desire to be heard? With Twitter’s share price near its all-time lows, despite three years of Jack Dorsey’s magic, reinventing Twitter, I suspect that question is still relevant.


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Source: Atlanta Archives. (own edits)

Doomsday scenarios reversed. End of cheap European air travel?

Note, I have a long position in American Airlines (NASDAQ: AAL).

After COVID-19, nothing will be the same. The previous sentence is bullsh*t. …,” begins Scott Galloway in his last week’s essay, and he may just be right.

The Western world is in the midst of a terrifying crisis. On the scale of deaths-to-news-coverage, COVID-19 is a clear winner. We Westerners worry more about things that are close to us (so, not famine in Africa, for example) and that are out of our control. …

About

George Salapa

Guest writer Venturebeat|Forbes|CCN. Consultant and founder of bardicredit.com.

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