In New York and states across the country, stay-at-home orders are lifting, and non-essential businesses are reopening to the public. For many, life is beginning to feel a little more “normal.” With a conclusive vaccine still in the works, however, Americans are now faced with the challenge of navigating their daily lives amidst the present danger of COVID-19. As the nation slowly attempts to resume somewhat normal operations, new social standards and individual practices must be implemented in order to mitigate the threats posed by the virus.

As directed by guidelines set forth by the the Center for Disease Control…


When COVID first hit the United States in early 2020, a steep incline in case numbers necessitated lock down measures, confining many to their homes. Even now as stay-at-home mandates ease across the nation, many Americans are working from home, studying from home, and spending more time inside than ever before.

Not surprisingly, these new “normal” lifestyles have presented distinct challenges for the maintenance of both physical and mental health. Weight gain, anxiety, and depression are all reportedly on the rise — likely due to increased isolation and fewer opportunities for exercise.

As an occupational therapist in Brooklyn, New York…


Over the course of the last several years, the widespread popularity of social media has drastically altered how we communicate and process information. Not shockingly, these platforms have played a tremendous role in how the global population has encountered, processed, and navigated the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Like all things, social media has its own distinct pros and cons in context of COVID-19. While networking outlets such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and even TikTok have proven excellent resources for spreading awareness about the virus, they have also posed considerable threats by enabling the spread of harmful misinformation.

The following is Brooklyn…


The implications of the coronavirus pandemic have been far-reaching, resulting in a period of rapid change and extended uncertainty. While social distancing mandates have been implemented to help mitigate the spread of the virus, many individuals are struggling to overcome increased feelings of anxiety. Certified occupational therapist, Gertrude Robertson, provides some expert insight into how to handle feelings of anxiety as the result of social distancing.

1. Practice Deep Breathing

A highly effective means to combat stress and anxiety can be as simple as practicing deep breathing. Deep diaphragmatic breathing is a powerful anxiety-reducing technique, and according to Robertson, activates the parasympathetic nervous system…


In the wake of COVID-19, the world is currently facing the realities of social distancing orders as a means to curb the virus’s effects and protect our most vulnerable populations. The weight of these circumstances is heavy, and many individuals, especially those with established mental health concerns, are consequently experiencing heightened symptoms of anxiety and depression.

However, an important distinction to make amidst government mandates is that social distancing does not mean avoiding interaction entirely. Staying connected with friends and family members has a wide range of benefits, whether it be emotionally, cognitively, or holistically.

The Importance of Social Interaction

As a certified occupational therapist…


The implications of the coronavirus pandemic have been far-reaching, resulting in a period of rapid change and extended uncertainty. While social distancing mandates have been implemented to help mitigate the spread of the virus, many individuals are struggling to overcome increased feelings of anxiety. Certified occupational therapist, Gertrude Robertson, provides some expert insight into how to handle feelings of anxiety as the result of social distancing.

1. Practice Deep Breathing

A highly effective means to combat stress and anxiety can be as simple as practicing deep breathing. Deep diaphragmatic breathing is a powerful anxiety-reducing technique, and according to Robertson, activates the parasympathetic nervous system…


Unemployment continues to be a source of distress amid the COVID-19 pandemic and many people are uncertain as to what financial recourse they are entitled to receive, unconvinced as to whether it will be enough. At the time of writing, over 36 million people in the U.S. have filed unemployment claims over the past two months since the onset of the pandemic.

Seeking to mitigate these effects on the residents, Governor Andrew Cuomo has assured workers of job protection and financial compensation if they are ordered into a state of isolation or quarantine.

Gertrude Robertson, an occupational therapist in Brooklyn…


Families are highly reliant on digital access preserving a connection with their loved ones, keeping quality time possible, though at a distance, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold.

In-person contact might be prohibited, but people can thankfully make alternate arrangements rather easily, ensuring that they minimize loneliness, strengthen their mental health, and maintain a social bond with family members.

Gertrude Robertson, an occupational therapist in Brooklyn, New York, shares a few ways for families to remain socially active during these emotionally taxing circumstances.

Social Media

Social media allows families to stay in touch, virtually, through messaging or commenting, Gertrude Robertson states…


Occupational therapists (OTs) are healthcare professionals who focus on offering clients solutions to challenges arising from injury, illness, and disability. Their primary goal is to help you, or your loved ones perform tasks, or occupations, related to everyday self-care as well as professional and recreational activities in order to live full, happy lives. OTs work with a wide variety of clients in every age group, specializing in countless fields, and deliver custom human-centric plans for treatment tailored to individuals and their environment.

Gertrude Robertson is a seasoned OT working in Brooklyn, New York. One of the questions she often gets…


From Brooklyn, New York, Gertrude Robertson OTR/L is an occupational therapist.

What do you love most about the industry you are in?

What I love is how I get to contribute to helping make a difference in a person’s daily function. I love the fact that I’m working with people that are in need. I’ve always been someone who helps people, so, for me, this particular profession fits my overall personality and lifestyle.

What keeps you motivated?

My motivation roots from every small amount of progress I see in my patients. I work in both geriatrics and pediatrics, and the…

Gertrude Robertson

Occupational Therapy from Brooklyn, New York

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