Feelings-first voters have found a voice in Donald Trump
The Economist
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Here’s the thing, the conspiracy prone people are simply a subset of a much more pervasive group. People looking for easy answers. Some people just can’t handle the idea that the intelligence community failed, and terrorists are a very real threat so 9/11 was a conspiracy instead. Or that many of us feel ill due to the fact we constantly bath in a toxic soup thanks to our modern lifestyle, no it’s planes dumping chemicals in the air in the form of chemtrails. It’s much easier to promote an easy answer to why these things happened then it is to admit that we have some really complicated problems to solve.

To a certain extent this is all of us. We’d all love it if all it would take is a UBI or no taxes to fix our current economic woes, or a powerful/reduced military, or a more hardline/softer foreign policy, and so on. We look to our leaders to have these easy answers and then sacrifice them in earnest when they don’t. Take Obama for example. Other than the TPP I think his policies have been pretty much well thought out. But he’s had to deal with a shit storm that he was handed on entering office and with the fact that politicians are less compromising/cooperating today than in the past. And how many people lambast him because he still hasn’t fixed everything…. I mean every last little problem. Because that’s what they expect, what they need to believe, that it’s really an easy problem to solve.

And it’s this human tendency that Trump taps into. There’s a reason he’s long on empty rhetoric consisting of soundbite easy answers and short on real concrete solutions. Some people really want to believe that all it would take is a wall between Mexico and the US to fix all the immigration problems, or that keeping Muslims out would eliminate terrorism, or that he’ll create jobs for everyone on entering office, and so on. They need to believe that previous politicians have lied and Trump has all the easy answers. Are they wrong about being lied to? No, but not for the reasons they think.

Trump is a very unique candidate, he’s the first non-professional politician in a very very long time. He didn’t start within his party's grass roots with relatively small offices/positions and then worked his way up to the presidency, building support as he went. No, he’s an outsider who’s first office will be the top job. Because of this he has no political track record. He doesn’t have any broken promises for the voters to point to. He’s never had to justify switching a position. Almost every other politician has at one point or another. So they’re very careful not to over promise or trap themselves in a corner due to previous statements. And pretty much get into office by being charming while vague and misdirecting where policy is concerned.

That’s why Romney didn’t score as high, he knew that too many simple answers could be his downfall. But either Trump doesn’t realize this or just doesn’t care. He’s either a raving lunatic that actually believes all the problems have easy obvious solutions, or a very crafty psychopath that understands people well enough to know how to use easy answers to manipulate them. This makes him kind of scary and potentially a very dangerous president if he wins. Or it might be that he’ll actually be what some people hope, a president that isn’t beholden to any outside influences, and all of his antics are simply theater to get him elected. But that’s a long shot, an extreme long shot.

But as I stated Trump isn’t a candidate for the feelings first groups so much, but more the candidate for the easy answers ones. And he just might be able to ride those easy answers right into the Whitehouse.