After reading 60 books in 2018, I set myself a target of reading 78 books (50% more) during 2019, and I failed quite miserably — closing the year with 52 books read, around one per week.

As usual, I’d love to share my full list along with some notes and recommendations.

These are the five books that I most enjoyed reading this year, in no particular order.

Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Matthew Walker


For 2018, I set my reading goal at 60 books — and I’d love to share with you some of the books that I read that most impacted me this year.

We all know that some books have the power to change our lives, or to change the way that we look at the world — and I’m always on the quest to read more of those, so I would love to get your recommendations on the comments below. If you’d like to follow some of the stuff that I’m reading — you can follow me on Goodreads.

I read…


When you look at people who are tremendously successful, there is often one characteristic that they tend to share — they read a lot. They also point it as one of the best ways to learn and grow as a person — which is one of the main reasons why I wanted to make reading a more common activity in my life.

These last couple of years, I’ve been rather underwhelmed with the amount of reading I’ve been able to do. …


Originalmente publicado na Revista Human Resources Portugal em 16–05–2017.

Hoje em dia, cada vez mais profissionais de topo tomam a decisão de trocar empregos em empresas grandes e estabelecidas por pequenas startups. Neste artigo iremos olhar para as coisas boas de trabalhar numa startup, bem como as menos boas, e avançar com alguns conselhos para quem está a pensar em mudar para essa área.

O bom…

O impacto.

Uma das principais razões avançadas por alguém que decidiu enveredar pelo mundo das startups é sempre a questão do impacto que o nosso trabalho pode ter, em comparação com trabalhar numa grande empresa.

As…


Hi. I’m Gil and I’m the COO of Hole19 Golf. I recently made a life changing decision, and I’d love to tell you about it.

Imagine you worked for one of the hottest startups in the world for its respective field. One that had raised hundreds of millions of dollars in funding and valued at over 1 billion. One that served tens of millions of users on a monthly basis. …


CONGRATULATIONS! You’ve managed to hire a new colleague to join your company. That’s great news. You’ve done the hardest part, and now comes the part that many companies (foolishly) seem to ignore, but that is absolutely essential if you want your new amazing hire to have as much impact on the company as you need them to have. The unfortunate truth is that many companies only hire people when they’re absolutely swamped and desperate, which then means that they don’t invest the proper amount of time to ensure that the new hire has all the tools they need to succeed…


In the past few posts, we discussed how to prepare, plan, structure and execute your hiring strategy. So hopefully by now you’ve been able to start interviewing people and moving them through your hiring process. However, finding the right people to join your team is a difficult and ongoing task, especially if you’re hiring for more than one role. As such, it becomes really important for you to be able to identify any potential problems with your hiring structure so that you are able address them and make your process more efficient. Because a hiring process is such a long…


If only it was always this easy…

If you’ve been reading my previous posts then you should already have a good idea of how you can get plenty of candidates into your funnel (let’s call it a pipeline), regardless of whether you’re using an active strategy or a passive one. Congratulations, you’ve done the easiest part.

The hardest thing is actually being able to identify whether or not these candidates and you are a good fit for each other, making sure you don’t hire false positives, or even worse: miss out on a false negative (There’s a great post about this here). …


Hard practice. Easy fight.

Many companies only think about hiring once they’re actually in a pinch, and after rushing to hire someone, they usually forget all about it, only to repeat their efforts once they again need to hire someone. Rinse. Repeat. But what if I told you that there are ways to make sure that you’re attracting good candidates, even when you’re not specifically looking? Even if you’re not looking to hire someone right now, the truth is that as a company, you should always be looking to attract top talent, and below, I will detail several methods that will make sure that…


You’re never going to find what you’re looking for if you don’t know where to look for it.

You already know who it is that you want to hire, why you are hiring them, what skills they need to have, and by when you should hire them. That’s awesome, now you need to draft up a game plan of how you’re going to find this person.

If someone is coming to work at your company, there are many paths that they can take. And it’s up to you to find the right balance between those paths in order to get the best results.

More doesn’t always mean better.

Common sense would tell you that when you’re searching for a perfect candidate, you’d want…

Gil Belford

Advisor and investor. Obsessed with VC, apps and all things internet-related. Lover of food, wine and dogs.

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