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Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

On the last day in May, while out for dinner with some friends, I glanced at my phone and read a news alert from CNN: “At least 11 people are dead and six hospitalized after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach, Virginia.”

“Oh, god,” my mind read in disbelief. A grimace swept across my face and for a second I thought about interrupting the night’s pleasantries to bring up the news. Instead, I slipped the phone back into my pocket, forgot about the shooting and went right back to my dinner.

Over the weekend, other news tidbits of the shooting — in which DeWayne Craddock, an engineer of the city government’s public utilities department, gunned down 12 people inside the municipal building and outside in a car before being killed in a shootout with police — managed to reach me through additional news alerts and posts I’d carelessly pass through mindless scrolls on social media. …


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Official portrait of United States Vice President Joe Biden in his West Wing Office at the White House.

Joe Biden has a dire warning for Americans: reelect Donald Trump as president and the country will undergo a monumental shift.

After months of speculation, Joe Biden announced his run for the nation’s highest office in 2020 by releasing a video late last month that was all preach and void of platform.

“I believe history will look back on four years of this president, and all that he embraces, as an aberrate moment in time,” Biden said of Trump’s presidency. …


Politicians are increasingly live-streaming on Instagram, many in hopes to look authentic and common.

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Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was known for his fireside chats, a series of radio broadcasts he gave to inform the American public of his policies while maintaining a close connection.

During his rise to the presidency, John F. Kennedy took advantage of the then newly developed technology of television to broadcast his image and his politics.

A cool, collected and suave Kennedy outmatched a stumbling and sweating Richard Nixon during a critical televised debate in 1960.

Fast forward into the 21st century and the platform politicians use to communicate is completely different. …


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Photo by Mirah Curzer on Unsplash

For the first time in eight years, the Democrats have retaken control of the House of Representatives from the Republicans. Their plan fell short, however, of a total blue-wave takeover, as the Republicans retained control of the Senate during last week’s midterm elections.

Still, the Democrats have broken through the Republican’s fortress of red. Though Trump was not a candidate in the elections it didn’t mean he was off people’s minds. Democrats running vied to reinstate their control and therefore curtail the powers of the president’s administration. Republicans sought to hold their feet firmly where they stood. …


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Photo by G. Crescoli on Unsplash

On Nov. 1st, days before the midterm elections, President Trump spoke from the West Wing about policy changes regarding the immigrant caravan coming from Central America, as well as the larger policy at hand pertaining to immigrants.

CNN, the cable news network Trump and his fellow fans deride as nothing more than fake news, aired Trump’s spiel of fear mongering and lies in its entirety, almost half an hour. CNN, as well as cable news in general, had received criticism in the past for airing Trump’s campaign speeches and rallies uninterrupted back during his 2016 election run.

Prior to Trump’s speech the White House made a statement that Trump would discuss new asylum laws. It did not. What it did include, as Laura McGann reported for Vox, were “ridiculous to racist” claims, such…


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Photo by Кирилл Жаркой on Unsplash. Original caption: This is a photo of a protest which was held a year later famous Russian liberal politician Boris Nemtsov was killed. Photo was taken on Trinity Bridge in Saint Petersburg.

In the fiftieth minute of the World Cup final match, in the midst of a Croatian attack, three women and one man invaded the pitch and interrupted the momentum of the game.

Running across the field and evading the security, there was a brief spate of confusion and chaos. FIFA’s official broadcast policy is to cut away during these episodes but the invaders, cladded in police outfits, made it hard to decipher what was going on at first and to determine who was chasing who.

Though the broadcast of the protest was short lived, it was captured and forever documented by the tournament’s numerous sports photographers. …


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Photo by Tom Grimbert on Unsplash

Both England and Croatia had made it quite far, unexpectedly, to the semifinals. As with the France-Belgium match, one team would be booted out.

England’s sudden but joyous, successful ride throughout the tournament was galvanizing its fans back home, so much so that a meme was made of England’s performance to bring it — the World Cup — home.

At the beginning of the match, it looked like England was close to bringing it home. Early on in the 5th minute Kieran Trippier scored a goal from a free kick, his first goal of the tournament. Leading 1–0 over Croatia, England managed to dominate for the remainder of the first half, holding off against their opponent’s vicious offensive. …


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Photo by Tom Grimbert on Unsplash

Allez les bleus! Throughout France, the country has surely morphed into a state of euphoria. Les Bleus, one of the youngest teams in this year’s tournament, has fought against all odds to land a spot in the World Cup Final, their third appearance in 20 years.

Unbeaten (though they did tie with Denmark 0–0), the French blazed through formidable foes such as Argentina and Uruguay. This past Tuesday they swept the Belgian’s off their feet. But rather than their previous games where Les Bleus exhibited electrifying, flashes of great offensive feats, they instead took a more pragmatic, conservative approach. …


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Photo by Fauzan Saari on Unsplash

No one expected Russia to do well, including Russian fans themselves, who remained doubtful. Being the host nation, Russia automatically qualified for the tournament, yet they ranked last among all the contenders at 70th place, according to FIFA’s men’s football rankings.

But as this tournament has demonstrated, Russia made a sling of surprises, having advanced all the way to the quarter-finals before finally receiving the boot. In the tournament’s opening match — and Russia’s first — they dominated their opponent, Saudi Arabia, with a 5–0 win. They continued their stunning winning performance against Egypt, winning 3–0, much to the surprise of sports commentators, who expected an Egyptian win. …


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The White House. Photo by David Everett Strickler on Unsplash

In the June 18th issue of The New Yorker, Adam Entous examined Trump’s new foreign policy order in the Middle East, heavily influenced by Israel and the gulf states of Saudi Arabia and U.A.E.

Though many Middle Eastern countries still haven’t officially recognized Israel — aside from Jordan and Egypt — Saudi Arabia and the U.A.E. have slowly warmed up to Israel, negotiating and speaking with each other through backchannels and in secrecy, away from the eyes of the US. What binds these countries together, as Entous reports, is their view that Iran is the enemy in the region. …

About

Gerard Edic

Staff writer for the Greenwood Commonwealth, a daily newspaper in Greenwood, MS.

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