Facebook shopping
Facebook shopping
Facebook have been starting to look at ways they can incorporate shopping recently.

No one was surprised when Facebook recently announced it was going to launch a shop feature. As much as Facebook has always been the dominant social media channel, it has lost some momentum recently to newcomers like TikTok. Google and Amazon have never really been seen as competitors for Mark Zuckerberg’s gigantic social network, but could that be about to change? And what does this mean for brand protection? Like the early stages of many online marketplaces, it’s a concern how easily one can set-up to sell.

We looked into how easy it is to set-up a Facebook shop, and what the benefits are. …


online shopping
online shopping
Online shopping is very popular

Many people don’t realise how long e-commerce has been around. eBay, one of the original e-commerce platforms is 25 years old this year. Many advancements have been made, like e-wallets and social selling, and it looks as though the e-commerce market is only set to continuously grow. One of the main ways to expand on your current digital brand protection strategy is to ensure you are aware of all of the different places your product could be sold.

In this article, we take a look at some of the e-commerce platforms and what features they offer, and what is in store for them in the future. …


Social media is big business. There are hundreds or thousands of companies that utilise social media for advertising and selling. Youtube and Facebook are two of the most visited websites in the world. But the conversation around social media rarely focuses on brand protection. While everyone wants to shout from the rooftops about data breaches and new features, the brand protection risks associated with each channel are rarely discussed.

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Social media channels can come with brand protection risks.

Facebook

Who are Facebook?

Facebook is sometimes seen as the “original” social media channel, because they are such an established presence. The story of Mark Zuckerberg inventing Facebook was even immortalised in a film in 2010. “The Social Network” follows Mark and his peers as they invent a page called “Facemash’” which then evolves into Facebook. The first weekend the site was launched (for Havard students only), it overwhelmed Havard’s network switches so much they shut it down. “Thefacebook.com” was officially launched in 2004, and in the years following it has become one of the biggest websites in the world, with 1.73 billion people across the world logging on to Facebook daily. If you are looking to start thinking about your social media monitoring processes then Facebook is a good place to start. Facebook also took over Instagram in 2012, for brands this is great as they can use Facebook’s advertising platform to buy both Facebook and Instragam inventory all from one place. …


Anyone using Amazon will have likely come across the term “third-party seller”. When shopping on Amazon, users have a choice between buying products that are directly shipped from Amazon, or products that are shipped by third-party sellers. Third-party sellers on Amazon range from huge companies like Debenhams to smaller companies. Third-party sellers are charged a fee by Amazon to use their platform, but as they have so many users, it usually works out beneficial for the seller. Third-party sellers get to utilise a lot of Amazon’s services like shipping and taking care of the payment. …


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T-shirts are one of the most popular products for print on demand — image source globaleyez.

You don’t need to be involved in e-commerce to know what “print-on-demand” services are. Although they are popular with dropshippers, there are also a number of print-on-demand services that exist to cater to the average consumer. The concept is simple: you create a design online and it gets printed and delivered to you, or you push the design through to a storefront like Shopify and people can buy it. But what are the risks here? …


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Fulfilment is a very important link in the chain that makes up online marketplaces.

If you are new to e-commerce, or maybe someone who doesn’t need to know a lot of e-commerce, you probably wouldn’t have heard the term “fulfillment”. All businesses selling a product will have fulfilment as part of their process, but because it can be outsourced to a third-party in the e-commerce space, the term is used often. Fulfillment simply means filling an order. We recently wrote a post about “fulfilled by eBay” on our regular blog, so we thought we would clear up what fulfillment actually is on our brand protection dictionary.

Where in the process does fulfillment occur?

Once an e-commerce business sets up their online shop, the next step is to fulfill all of the orders made online. Orders need to be fulfilled and then shipped to the buyers home country. If you were to deal with fulfillment in-house, you would need a warehouse and a delivery company. Setting it up in-house is a reasonable option if you are starting small. But for someone who might want to start a big dropshipping business with loads of different products, outsourcing the fulfillment is probably the best bet. Many products you see advertised on marketplaces like Wish or on Facebook are fulfilled by third-party companies. This is why social media monitoring is so important if you are creating a digital brand protection strategy. …


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Online marketplaces are popular worldwide

If you are a casual user of online marketplaces like eBay or AliExpress, you might not have put much thought into how they actually work. If you get your order on time and it is right then realistically you have no reason to think any further into it. An online marketplace is an e-commerce platform that allows a user to shop around a number of different merchants on one website or app. This is extremely beneficial to the user, as it often means they get the best price. …


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(Image source — wish.com)

Thanks to the power of social media, Wish have gained notoriety over the last couple of years for some of the weird and wonderful products their vendors offer. While you wouldn’t think that cat face masks or trousers with Nicolas Cage’s face on them (yes really) would become a profitable business, you’d be surprised at how quickly Wish’s popularity has risen, not only in Asia but in Europe as well. It seems customers can’t get enough of the shopping platform with a UI that matches all of their favourite social media apps. …


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(Image source — AliExpress)

Thanks to some smart moves recently, Alibaba has become a household name, not only in Southeast Asia, but also in Europe and America. Rather than compete, they seem to be set on buying companies like Lazada and helping them to grow. While this strategy seems to have been successful so far in helping them to dominate the Asian e-commerce market, becoming a genuine competitor to Amazon in Europe is something that seems still just out of their reach. …


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Bukalapak logo (taken from website)

If we were to say Bukalapak is a “unicorn” you would wonder what we mean. Everyone knows that unicorns have a place in the hearts of all children, but we are not talking about the actual mythical creatures. In finance, a “unicorn” is a startup company that is privately held and valued at over $1billion. Bukalapak are one of the largest e-commerce companies in Indonesia. Although companies like Lazada and Shopee do have a lot more written about them in the international press and on brand safety blogs, they really are making important moves in the e-commerce space.

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globaleyez — the brand protection dictionary

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