COP26 — What Was It All About?

Glasgow Science Center
  • Harm to our health — Rising temperatures bring heatwaves (which overpower the human body and cause dehydration, heatstroke, and major organ damage), pollution brings poor air quality/wildfires (which penetrate one’s lungs and lead to burning eyes, heart/lung diseases, and even death), and vector-borne diseases bring illnesses (which, as the earth gets warmer, enable viruses to travel faster by means of insects/arachnids).
  • More extreme weather — As water evaporates into the atmosphere on both land and sea (returning to the earth in the form of rain and snow), as the world warms up the rate of evaporation from the oceans begins to increase and cause storms capable of immense destruction. Though at first this may appear as a good way to gain healthier/wetter soil, since rain which falls as vicious downpour won’t soak into the ground gently it will instead run into rivers and gets carried back to the sea. Thus, as this is simply a continuous cycle no water gets absorbed and the land gets drier and drier over time.
  • Reduced water security — Water is a human essential for everyone, with the lack of it causing death within just a short amount of time. As the increase in global temperatures due to climate change clearly lead to droughts (as mentioned before), places like Cape Town are only receiving about half their average annual rainfall. Therefore, as this process is only continuing each day it is only a matter of time before whole countries fall from the devastating impacts of low water security. Harm to agriculture/food — With farmers around the world dependent on stable climates in order to grow the crops they need to have food on the table, with climate change leading to more droughts, floods, and extreme weather harvests can simply get washed or withered away in a matter of time (through these unstable conditions which are hard to adapt to). Overall, though many argue that carbon dioxide serves as food for these plants and that mass downpour helps to keep vegetation nourished, more harm actually ends up being done to both the farmer and their crops instead.
  • Harm to the economy — With extreme weather related to the effects of climate change having clear links to economic repercussions, we can understand that the more wildfires, droughts, floods, and other environmental hazards occur the more money needs to be spent for recovery. In other words, because severe events may cause immense damage to costly infrastructure and other expensive resources it is easy for several billion dollars to get spent in order to restore everything and everyone that needs restoration.
  • being recognized as credible and science-based
  • joining a community of members who span from numerous regions/sectors and will share their practices
  • accessing communication tools that assist in the coming of future COP events
  • playing a vital role in the the times of need for climate action
  • receiving support in achieving any desired goals

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store