The Cost of Criminalizing Cannabis

Venom from a snake’s fangs is so specialized to human and animal systems that it causes severe pain, blood clotting or thinning and even paralysis. The small chains of amino acids that make up the snake’s tonic all have a specific target within the victim that causes a reaction, allowing the snake to escape, or eat their prey.

The irony in all of this is potent poisons from snakes, scorpions and even plants have been used to save lives.

It’s the specificity of each compound within the poison that makes them so useful to science, and limiting the doses allows researchers and clinicians to ensure the desired effect happens fast.

Potent poisons from snakes, scorpions and even plants have been used to save lives

However, these highly specific medications are not limited to poisons — there are still many useful, naturally occurring compounds that can be found in other plants and bacteria, such as Marijuana.

According to an article in The Scientist, marijuana contains cannabinoids that bind to receptors in the human body’s nervous, endocrine, gastrointestinal, immune and cardiovascular systems. Essentially, the cannabinoids that are found in marijuana can be used to control almost the entire human body.

Marijuana is a difficult plant to study because the American government classifies the plant as a “schedule one drug” that has the potential to be abused and has no accepted medical use.

If there is a treatment, or at least something to take the edge off painful conditions such as MS, it should be used — even if it isn’t yet legal.

Because of current legislation researchers have taken extra steps to grow and purify compounds found in cannabis for medical and scientific use. Funding is available for marijuana research, however it is harder to get. Approval times can take up to a year to process before the researcher can even begin working to prove or disprove a hypothesis.

Dr. Louis J. Papa is a primary care physician interviewed on the popular medical television show Second Opinion. Papa believes that if there is a treatment, or at least something to take the edge off painful conditions such as MS, it should be used — even if it isn’t yet legal.

“… It’s difficult to study it. You have to have a specific situation to study it being a schedule one drug, it says there’s no benefit to it — which is crazy, I mean, we’re allowed to use radiation and arsenic, but there’s no benefit to marijuana,” he said.

Read the full story at Goodleaf.com

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