The Internet is a Trash Hole and We Can Make it Better.

Blogging has become my new life.

Source: Giphy

As an aspiring writer in the 21st century, it’s crucial to have a presence online. Even if I’m screaming into the void, at least my voice will get heard, right?

Wrong.

I’ve been reading a ton online lately and frankly, I don’t really care about most of this shit I’m seeing. It’s typically nothing new, which is bad, but what’s worse is that people publish stuff that’s so poorly written it’s almost unbelievable. It nearly kills me every time I see a “published” piece that has blatant spelling or punctuation errors, poor form, and claims to be fresh. Often I can get behind reading about the mundane if it’s written in passable English, but the majority of the stuff in the internet world is not.

The problem is we need to create good content. That’s what separates those who succeed from those who are struggling. The internet is a trash hole of a place with a lot of bad information, but as journalists and writers we can actively work to change that by putting in a slight amount of effort with what we’re doing. And frankly, even the most mundane becomes less so with simple craftsmanship.

Writing quality material professionally takes TONS of practice. It requires countless hours of time and persistence and an attention to detail that not a lot of people can afford to take. However, for short blog posts that are done on the side, we can still nurture our pieces and take the time to craft something we’re proud of, even if that means simply re-reading your piece a second time. I’m the first to admit that my content might not be the most “revolutionary” (who wants to read about the life of another 20-something white girl?) or attainable, but at least it’s passable English that can connect with an audience member.

While writing takes a fair amount of time, it’s ultimately worth it to have your ideas heard and your voice projected; we risk missing so many fantastic ideas on this giant planet if they’re communicated poorly. To quote Hemingway, “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master,” but that lack of mastery should never stop us from trying to get better. Ultimately, we can rise above lazy writing and make the world a better place.

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