Photo credit: Annie Spratt

Making things come in tens; how I’m learning how to write (again).

I used to write a lot, for no one but myself. I’d write these-really-aren’t-poems, I’d write the beginning of a story 5 times over, I’d write single sentences just because the words sounded good together.

Then I started working in marketing and my voice started working in marketing too. My favourite word combinations got lost to cliches because I didn’t know any other way to sound professional.

With my mental energy spent on forced professionalism and copywriting, my personal writing dwindled — and I didn’t even notice. It didn’t feel like I was cutting out a piece of my life, it just felt like I had nothing left to say.

Traveling was the only exception here: I’d launch blogs that were mostly just for me, where I could write without being held down to a format. I think it was also so far removed from my normal headspace that everything felt worth writing about.

This year, I’ve been slowly realising how much there is to be said.

How much I have to say.

How much things I care about at home need a voice.

How much words can do to coax conversation where before there were only walls.

So I’m trying a thing I read in a piece by James Altucher.

I’m placing my bets on the power of ten, and writing lists. Some lists may be personal, some may be professional. Some may be entirely full of shit. But I’m hoping in flexing my mental muscles, in pushing myself to ten ideas no matter what topic, I’ll be able to find what it means to think and write for myself again.

If you have a topic you’d like to set me, I’m all ears*.

* That’s the last cliche, I promise.


If you’re also trying this whole list of ten things (uh…) thing, perhaps we could be friends? I’m a fan of coffee adventures, beach air and sunlight. If those sound like things you also enjoy — well, hello!

If they don’t — hello stranger! We have so much to learn about each other.

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