By AlphaNetworks

The way we measure how people watch video content is broken. In 2018, Nielsen, the 94-year-old legacy company responsible for $100 billion in advertising, still measures TV ratings partly by having select Americans keep a paper TV diary of everything they watch, and then mail it to headquarters.

It hard to believe, but it’s true.

The New York Times reported on these diaries, noting that one participant, Dennis Cheatham, reported having no room to log the time his family spent watching Netflix, “I just kind of shoved it in there and wrote Netflix wherever I could.”

To be fair, paper diaries aren’t the only way Nielsen generates TV ratings. They also use Nielsen meters, which are attached to participant’s cable boxes.

Nielsen counts the number of people in the prized 18–49 demo who watch TV ads live, up three days after air (C3), and up to seven days after air (C7). …


By Alpha Networks

Learn more at AlphaNetworks.io

By all accounts, Netflix’s Stranger Things has been a smash hit, bordering on a cultural phenomenon. The show has received near unanimous praise by critics and immense hype on social media. However, no one knows how many people have actually watched the show. It makes you wonder what kind of king’s ransom the Duffer brothers could have asked for in negotiations for season three.

Unlike shows that appear on cable and can be measured by Nielsen ratings, Netflix doesn’t release it’s viewership numbers. …


Learn more at AlphaNetworks.io

By Alpha Networks

We are living in an era of nearly infinite content. So much so that John Landgraf, FX Networks Chief, has said, “There is simply too much television.” In the history of media, there has never been more opportunities to create and consume content.

And yet, the economic model of media and its supporting infrastructure remains fundamentally broken.

Cord-cutters are abandoning cable TV in droves. Over-the-Top (OTT) media providers like Netflix have made cable packages an archaic relic of the past. …

Gregory Markel

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