Path to Priesthood

By Tim Schmitt, Gerard Menna, and Jeff Arama

July 21, 2015

BOSTON — Walking through the streets of Boston, you might notice two ordinary friends in ordinary clothes laughing and talking on a bench. You might just think they’re typical college students with nothing better to do. However, this certain pair of friends, Alan and George, prove this stereotype wrong.

Both are students, but rather students in seminary school. Despite learning to become priests, they dress down in what one might consider ordinary clothes, and show an unknown reality of attaining priesthood- that it does not prevent fun. Both felt an intense calling to priesthood, and while they’re devoutly religious, they still find them to relax and unwind during their studies in the city.

We saw this pair sitting on a bench on the Boston University campus, and although they appeared to be normal, we felt the urge to interview them. And luckily, by chance or by fate, they provided details about their own journeys to priesthood.

Alan, a graduate in political science (with a minor in philosophy) of Purdue University turned away from a dream in politics to further study philosophy. He stated that he felt a certain connection with God, and said said, “I believe that everyone is born with a talent or a gift from God.” His own specific talent, or gift, was his dedication to faith and priesthood.

George, wearing a black shirt featuring the Virgin Mary with the words “Ave Maria” underneath, is a friend of Alan’s also in seminary school. He spoke to us about his Catholic upbringing, and his own specific call to religious vocation. Unlike Alan, stated he felt his calling after finishing college, George was first called by God in his freshman year, at age thirteen, and recalls God wanting him to become a priest: “I didn’t feel like I wanted to become a priest until my senior year; my senior year I answered yes to God and I haven’t turned back since.”

Now both friends are on a seminary retreat in Boston to study philosophy. Having traveled all the way from Indiana, they stated that they are enjoying Boston, but ultimately will return to their home states to continue their studies in priesthood further.

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