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“People leave managers, not companies” — Marcus Buckingham, First, Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently

Have you ever worked on a team where you knew your boss wasn’t on your side? It can be very had to know this and still have no choice but to stick with the team and report to the same boss. Now before you dismiss this issue as trivial and say, “Screw the boss, I am not going to tolerate this nonsense. I am gonna quit my job and move on’”, hear me out.

Unfortunately, this is not a choice for available for everyone. The reasons can range from being in debt to not having an alternative source of income or an emergency fund in case of a job loss. The reality is that people are forced to put up with the same boss even though they hate working with him or her. …


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Being an immigrant has its own challenges, and I was curious to know from other immigrants how they were dealing with their finances. I wanted to find out the unique challenges they were facing and how they dealt with them.

Today I am excited to present our 4th guest in the series an anonymous reader that goes with the twitter handle @frugallatino. He chose to be anonymous for this interview and hence we haven’t revealed his real identity.

I hope you enjoy this interview as much as I did.

1. Can you tell us about yourself? Please include any details you feel comfortable sharing about how long you’ve been in the US, what you do for a living and your income range.

I’m a 39-year-old male from Latin America. I have been in the US since 2004 when I came to grad school. I’ve worked as a safety consultant for about 11 years altogether. In my first job back in 2007, I made $36K a year. That job only lasted a few months because the organization could not sponsor a working visa for me. …


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Today’s let’s talk about one of the sacred cows of the personal finance community — The Emergency Fund. Almost every personal finance guru out there will recommend you to have one and most of them would recommend you to carry some amount at least.

Before I started reading about personal finance, I had no clue about it and TBH, I have never carried any emergency fund for most of my adult life. As I read more about personal finance, an emergency fund is one of the most frequently spoken about topic. …


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Being an immigrant has its own challenges and I was curious to know from other immigrants how they were dealing with their finances. I wanted to find out the unique challenges they were facing and how they dealt with them. This interview series is an attempt to share the stories of immigrants and how they manage their finances.

I am very happy to present our second guest for the interview series, Rocky Lalvani from Richer Soul. He teaches financial planning and growing your wealth and help you avoid the mistakes he made during his journey to build wealth.

I hope you enjoy this interview as much as I did. …


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Being an immigrant has its own challenges and I was curious to know from other immigrants how they were dealing with their finances. I wanted to find out the unique challenges they were facing and how they dealt with them. This interview series is an attempt to share the stories of immigrants and how they manage their finances.

I am very happy to present our first guest for the interview series, the blogger behind Small Budget Retirement. …


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Have you ever stumbled upon a solution to a problem that has been nagging you for years and felt like you’ve finally cracked the code? Back in 2018, I had such a moment. After being totally blindsided to the world of personal finance, I had finally, discovered how to manage my finances. I was never good at managing my money and I had a very negative relationship with money.

During the early days of my life, I have witnessed a lot of scarcity around money and have heard a lot of negative talk around how building wealth is a selfish pursuit. I have often battled with this idea internally and haven’t been able to resolve them. For the longest time in my childhood, I just had one recurring theme about money — It’s evil and pursuing it makes you selfish. …


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How to Save for Retirement Without a 401(k)

401(k)s are undoubtedly the most important retirement vehicles available today, given that pensions are on the decline and the future of Social Security doesn’t look bright. What makes 401(k)s super important is an alarming number of Americans have little to nothing saved for retirement individually.

According to this CNBC article, nearly 42% of Americans could retire broke and on the other hand this article from MSN, Even 75% of Americans in the best 401(k) plans won’t have enough to retire only goes to show how bad things can get, even for those who have a 401(k).

According to the statistics offered from PEW research, it appears that about 1/3 of Americans don’t have access to a defined benefit plan like a 401(k). That begs the question, “How should you save for retirement without a 401(k)?”


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Courtesy — Wikipedia

Alexander the Great was busy conquering the known world once, when he saw, on the banks of the Indus river in today’s Pakistan, a naked guy sitting in the Lotus position and contemplating the dirt. “Gymnosophists” (gumnos = naked, sophistes = philosopher) the Greeks called these men. We would call them yogis — as in Patanjali, say

“What are you doing?”, asked Alexander.

“Experiencing nothingness” answered the yogi.

“What are you doing?”, asked the yogi.

“Conquering the world,” said Alexander.

Then both men laughed, each thinking that the other must be a fool.

“Why is he conquering the world?”, thought the yogi. …


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Courtesy — Pixabay

The United States has recognized April as Financial Literacy Month. Grokking Money, a site dedicated to building better money habits, will be publishing articles throughout the month to shine a spotlight on the importance of financial literacy.

This week we are excited to feature the first guest post for the Financial Literacy Series by Kassandra Dasent.

Kassandra Dasent is a member of GenX; a voice representing the sandwich generation who deals with competing priorities all the while working hard to hold it down for my family. …


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Courtesy — Pixabay

When I first started learning about personal finance, it felt as if I had a huge pile of information to wade through before I could even wrap my head around it.

For e.g. when I wanted to learn how to set up a budget, I looked into several budgeting videos on YouTube before I settled down on something that worked for me. The same applied to decide whether I need to pay off debt or invest? Should I use a credit card or cut them up? The list goes on.

Over the course of this exercise, I realized one thing. Every single topic I encountered, had so many conflicting recommendations that it was up to me to decide which path I needed to take. If you are new to any of this, it will make your head spin. I quickly realized that personal finance is more personal than finance. I am glad I realized it early before I went down a rabbit hole. …

About

Grokking Money

I am a millennial dad, husband, Engineer and a money enthusiast. I write about personal finance: https://grokkingmoney.com/

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