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Sunday morning. Newscasts had predicted a stormy start to the day, but we awoke to sun rays peeking through dissipating clouds. What the hell do forecasters know?

I grabbed a cup of coffee and scrolled blankly through Twitter as I reflected on the week ahead: work to be done, projects to complete, obligations to fulfill. On the counter sat a cooking magazine I had picked up on a whim while shopping. “Our Best Blueberry Buckle” it promised.

I began pulling out the ingredients for the bake while pondering a tweet that had flitted through my feed.

Unlike most of the tweets I had scanned during my initial sips, this one stuck in my head, mainly because I have binge-watched many a show and love to recommend favorites. These days, though, I no longer respond immediately to such queries because I’ve found that my instantaneous selections often appear from others well before I weigh in. …


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NOTE: This post is another in a series considering the future of journalism and media education for my 2018 Disruptive Journalism Education Fellowship from the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at CUNY. This post focuses on connecting writing with multimedia.

For the past few months, you’ve heard me ramble on about the big-picture changes we’re working on at Drury University as part of my 2018 Tow-Knight #disruptive project.

Let me go little-picture on you.

As part of our overhaul, we’ve been revising and tweaking Multimedia Storytelling, an introductory course that runs students through a series of storytelling sprints. They tell photo stories. They craft Twitter threads. …


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NOTE: This post is another in a series considering the future of journalism and media education for my 2018 Disruptive Journalism Education Fellowship from the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at CUNY. This post focuses on verified curation, one of six curricular threads I outlined in an initial essay about journalism in our distracted age.

Over the past decade, our journalism curriculum at Drury University edged away from writing.

Responding to changes in the industry, we offered an integrated media major, blending video and Web competencies with traditional journalism skills to develop multimedia multitaskers. …


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Note: This post is another in a series exploring the future of journalism and media education for my 2018 #disruptive fellowship from the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at CUNY.

This summer, I met up with some high-school buddies as another of the gang turned 50. We reminisced about the old days, about the hair bands of the ’80s, about vinyl records and turntables.

We returned to those indelible moments when we would sit and actually listen to music.

Back then, it wasn’t background noise. Listening was an active process. You’d carefully select an album from your carefully curated collection — after all, you were spending a chunk of money to buy your vinyl — and you’d carefully remove the disc from its dust sleeve before placing it carefully on the turntable. (If you were a true audiophile, you’d also carefully clean it with a dust cleaner to extend the album’s purity.) …


NOTE: This post is one of a series considering the future of journalism and media education for my 2018 Disruptive Journalism Education Fellowship from the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at CUNY. This post considers the definition of news as we develop our new journalism curriculum.

So much in today’s frenetic information environment focuses on speed. Get it now. Post it now. Give me your hot take NOW.

Recently, Tronc decided to cut half the reporters and editors — including Editor-in-Chief Jim Rich — from the New York Daily News newsroom, according to a CNN report. …


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The house had fallen silent since the morning flurry. After a brunch of blackberry-laden pancakes, we had retreated to our silos of interest to enjoy the hot summer Sunday.

Our dogs were sprawled lazily on the couch, as if this day were for them and not fathers. A browse through my Instagram feed revealed a stream of Father’s Day celebrations among my friends and acquaintances, with fond childhood remembrances and toasts to grand patriarchs.

For me, the day had dimmed over the years since my dad died in 2011. Dad used to love the celebration when we were kids. We’d get him the usual array of bathroom items: a bar of shaving soap, a bathrobe, a bottle of English Leather. We’d play card games and listen to his favorite classical music. And we’d have a massive Sunday meal, with a hearty roast and too many side dishes, and tell jokes at the dinner table. …


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Perhaps we’ve reached the moment of Peak Podcast, with too much content chasing a limited number of interested listeners. Even as an engaged podcast consumer, I find it difficult to make time for all of the excellent shows I know are out there. (Thank God for long drives!)

I have, however, carved out precious media moments to dig into Trump Inc., the standout collaborative reporting effort of WNYC and ProPublica.

It is, quite simply, one of the most important journalistic projects today. Each episode makes my jaw drop. The reporters are not merely chronicling the Trump Organization’s questionable practices; they are tracking a level of business/government overlap that threatens the integrity of our institutions and our democracy. …


During my usual morning scroll through Twitter, I happened upon another creative story variant from the New York Times:

The form is not flashy; it’s an online variation of what we’ve done as journalists for years: Delving into the archives to identify the level of consistency among politicians’ positions. But the Times’ digestible format appeals to today’s demand for scannability.

For me, that post also spotlighted an insidious problem facing us today. As the pace and amount of media we consume rises, the content becomes less and less impactful and more ephemeral. We are flooding our brains with information, and much of it is leaking from our memories more quickly than ever. Remember #WomensMarch? Or the Access Hollywood video? …


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NOTE: So glad to see the return of the Carnival of Journalism, where a group of passionate folks dedicated to exploring the future of journalism share ideas on a single topic. This month’s prompt is courtesy of @brianboyer:

Regardless of how we present our stories to our audiences — online, on-air, or in print — do we truly take them into consideration? Is the topic being reported on truly considered during the newsgathering process? Do we realize we can’t copy what other organizations do just because it’s already been “solved” for us? …


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Today, Dad would have been 80.

Even though he died in 2011, he regularly visits me through such random, fleeting thoughts. Sometimes, it’s a tidbit like a birth date or a recipe ingredient. Other times, it’s a movie quote or a pun that he was fond of. Most often, he arrives through music.

Though Dad’s profession was banking, his true love was music, as an aficionado, composer, and performer, and that love was not lost on us kids. We listened to hours and hours of all genres of music growing up, although he leaned strongly classical. …

About

Jonathan Groves

Drury University prof/journalistic refugee searching for the future of journalism by whatever means necessary: Org. change. Social media. Nonprofit news.

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