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Nell’ultimo blog post abbiamo visto come l’inflazione distrugge i nostri risparmi a lungo andare e quindi dell’importanza di investirli in modo da ottenere l’effetto opposto: una crescita esponenziale dei nostri risparmi nel tempo.

In questo articolo continuiamo il discorso intrapreso in quel post andando a considerare le varie opzioni che abbiamo per utilizzare al meglio il nostro denaro. Chiaramente, partiamo con il presupposto che lasciare i soldi in cassaforte, in un normale conto bancario, o sotto il materasso non sia un’ottima idea, quindi non li menzioniamo neppure.

Cosa possiamo fare con i nostri risparmi?

In pratica ci sono solo tre cose ‘utili’ che possiamo fare con i…


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Spesso, quando si parla di investimenti, si tende ad associare una connotazione negativa al concetto. Si pensa spesso ad attività paragonabili al gioco d’azzardo, specialmente quando riguardano i mercati finanziari, e si pensa che comportino rischi altissimi con possibilità di ‘vincere’ limitate. È chiaro che, con questa premessa, per chi non l’ha mai fatto o per chi non ha diligentemente studiato come farlo bene, investire il proprio denaro in qualsiasi attività può far paura. Averne è normalissimo, specialmente all’inizio.

Nel corso delle prossime settimane, in articoli come questo e nel podcast, io e Jessica Lascar vi parleremo di quali sono…


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When you create a new Vapor application using the command line tools the framework provides, there’s no test target created by default. So, what do you need to do to add tests to your new app?

This guide will help you set up your Vapor project for testing.

TL;DR

I’ve created an alternative template for Vapor already set up for testing. If you’re creating a new project you can use the following command to kick start a project with testing in mind:

vapor new MyApp --template=https://github.com/gtranchedone/vapor-testing-template

N.B. The executable name given by this template is called Executable not App , like…


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An introduction

Swift 3 adds a new tool to our toolbox: the Swift Package Manager.

The Swift Package Manager is a tool for managing the distribution of source code, aimed at making it easy to share your code and reuse others’ code. The tool directly addresses the challenges of compiling and linking Swift packages, managing dependencies, versioning, and supporting flexible distribution and collaboration models.

Many languages have a package manager built by the authors of the language or the community around it. If you come from an iOS background, you can think about the Swift Package Manager as a CocoaPods for pure…


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Why it’s a good idea to use it + favorite packages and tips

The Swift programming language is great for building apps and, when Apple made it Open Source, it became appealing for server-side development as well.

If you work on a Mac, you’re probably editing all of your Swift files using Xcode. On Linux, however, there’s no such commodity.

As you probably know, Xcode is an Apple-made IDE that provides a beautiful interface, autocompletion, inline documentation, jump-to-reference, and many other features that are simply not available elsewhere when it comes to Swift or apps development for Apple platforms.

However, Xcode has a few problems. First of all, Apple created it for developing…


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Hexagonal Architecture. Source of the image unknown.

How to clean up a 3+ years old project and live happily ever after.

We’ve all been there: a software project was lucky enough to live on for years after the initial development, however, somewhere along the line it started to get crippled by patches and workarounds that were only meant to be temporary, but nobody ever got to clean up.

As a contractor, every few months I move to a different company. I’ve worked with start-ups and well-established companies alike. I’ve once joined a project early in the development process, left the team after shipping the app, and found myself working on that same project almost three years later. That was quite an…


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What Server-Side Swift means for web development and why you should care

Since its announcement in 2014, Swift has taken off to become one of the most popular programming languages on the planet. Not only that, according to a survey by StackOverflow, Swift is the second most loved programming language; the third most trending as well. In just over three years, that’s a remarkable achievement.

For some people, what made Swift appealing was the new syntax, the modern and functional features, and the inherent safety. For others, it was the promise Apple made to Open Source the language within a year from its launch. …


I’m not a prolific writer nor a good one but every now and then I still feel the need of sharing something with the world.

Over the years I’ve had several small blogs. Hosted on Blogger.com, Wordpress.com, self-hosted using Wordpress.org and GoDaddy, built from scratch as any nerdy software engineer would do and published using GitHub Pages and Jekyll. I even created a blog for my company’s website as a Rails app, hosting it on Heroku. Basically I can say I’ve “tried ’em all”.

Now I’m starting out on Medium and I’ve decided to migrate over some of the articles…


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Every software engineer feels a sense disgust when hearing the words legacy code. Strictly speaking legacy code it’s code you “inherit” from someone else, however, the term is more broadly used to indicate a piece of software that’s no longer maintained. Often it’s code that, although deprecated, is still in use because of dependencies spread across a large system. Anyway, Michael Feathers has a better definition

To me, legacy code is simply code without tests. I’ve gotten some grief for this definition. What do tests have to do with whether code is bad? …


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Since the introduction of the App Store, and even more when the Mac App Store arrived, a lot of discussion has been made around apps’ pricing models. Only last year a debate about the need for paid app upgrades raised among developers, but it eventually fade off… until a couple of weeks ago, when Apple released Logic Pro X as a separate, full-priced, app — deprecating the existing Logic Pro on the Store.

With this launch, Apple has reclaimed its intention of not allowing any paid upgrade to apps. Moreover, by a quick analysis of the apps featured by Apple…

Gianluca Tranchedone

Software Engineer and Investor. I write about programming and investing.

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