In a time of violence against women resurfacing overwhelmingly on the news, it was the best tv-show I could have asked for, simultaneously providing escapism and reflection while also being fun to watch.

Three women, who are friends, hugging each other in a moment of tenderness.
Three women, who are friends, hugging each other in a moment of tenderness.
Jane, Kat, and Sutton in one of the scenes from Season 4, available on Netflix outside the US. Season 5 premieres on Freeform on May 26th. | Source: Freeform

Different situations can make someone decide to start a new tv-show: dissatisfaction with all the shows one is currently watching, interest in it stemmed by anybody with a Twitter account hyping it up, or simply chance, manifesting itself in the Netflix algorithm showing you the newest additions to the platform the moment you are about to eat breakfast and looking for something to watch at the same…


My great-great-great-grandmother lived her long life an outcast, being punished for her independent (and probably judged libertine) choices

laptop with a State Archive document open, notebook with a family tree drawn on it, flowers on the bottom left corner and fairylights on the upper right corner; the picture’s rosy and warm colors remind of something from the past
laptop with a State Archive document open, notebook with a family tree drawn on it, flowers on the bottom left corner and fairylights on the upper right corner; the picture’s rosy and warm colors remind of something from the past
Photo by Author.

Wanting to learn more about my surname etymology made me aware of my great-great-great-grandmother, the woman who first had the surname I have always carried, who lived her long life as an outcast, being punished for her independent (and probably judged libertine by her peers) choices.

I have always wondered in my teenage years, after falling in love with Jane Austen’s novels, how would my daily life be recounted if I lived in her world. Would I have been in the same social circles as Emma, Lizzie, or Anne? Even they would not have had much in common was it…


Its intersectional feminism still has a way to go, but its didactic approach to depicting gender discrimination could enlighten teenagers.

“Moxie” protagonists Claudia and Vivian in one of the scenes set at their school. | Source: Netflix

Approaching a work of art defined feminist, either for its themes or the use of feminist jargon in its description, I find myself feeling simultaneously ecstatic — because consuming fiction thoroughly imbued with values I hold dear is something that does not happen regularly — and terrified — because the risk of messing it up is just around the corner, especially if said work is produced for a mainstream audience.

“Moxie” was released on Netflix on March 3rd and is a movie produced and directed by Amy Poehler, based on the book of the same name by Jennifer Mathieu. It…

Nella Gugliersi

Barista by day, writer by night and days off. BSc in Economics and MA in Journalism. Enthusiast fangirl, feminist and crazy cat lady.

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