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In the last blog, we saw what GitHub is, and how it helps a team manage their code. In this blog, we will set up a GitHub account and explore a few features.

Creating your GitHub account

Go to github.com.


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Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

Till now, we have covered the basics of Version Control System, what Git is, how it helps us in managing different versions of our files, using different Git commands, amending commits, the significance of creating different branches, and rolling back to a previous commit in case things go wrong.

Get the entire series here.

From this blog onwards I am starting the next most important portion of this series. We will learn to work with remotes and GitHub specifically. So let's goooo.✈

Till now we have been doing all the work locally, on our…


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Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

The last blog was a cheat sheet for all the git commands we have covered till now. We saw how to track files, stage or un-stage them, commit the changes, amend commits, branches, and manage merge conflicts.

In this blog, we look at a significant topic in Git, which I personally believe is the whole point of the existence of Git (well, I may also be wrong here).

Every commit made is the latest version of the changes made to the files in that repo. This means the previous commit contains some changes, and…


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In the last blog, we saw what merge conflicts mean. Then we created a conflict and learned how to resolve it. Here is a cheat sheet for all the Git commands that you use in a local system.

To install Git

Check my previous blog

Initialize Git repo

git init

Set basic user configuration variables

git config --global user.name <your_name>git config --global user.email <your_email_id>

These are used in commit logs to indicate who made that particular commit.

See the list of configuration variables

git config --list

Staging files

git add .orgit add -Aorgit add file_name //to track only a particular file(s)
git rm --cached <file_name> //to unstage a…


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Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

In the last blog, we saw more about branches, how to merge two or more branches and how they change files when we see them in file explorer. In this blog, we are going to learn about merge conflicts, what they mean, when they arise, and how to manage those conflicts.

Suppose there's a file in two branches. There have been changes in the file at the same location in both branches. So when you try to merge these two branches, you will get something called a merge conflict.

In a general situation, like…


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Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

In the previous part of Git Branches, we saw what a branch is, how to create branches, moving into that branch, and delete a branch. In this blog, we will learn how branches facilitate us in development and how we can merge two or more branches.

Change in files on switching branches

When you create a branch, say B, from an existing branch A, all the current files in A are copied into B. So B already contains some files. So when you change your current branch from A to B, in your file explorer(or using thels command in Linux)…


Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

In the last blog, we learned about how to commit changes, amend an already made commit, see commit logs, and learned what are the parts of a commit when you see it in the log. In this blog, we are going to learn about branches in git.

Whenever you create a new repo, the default branch created is called “main”(called as master in older git versions; however, you can easily change them and the new version of git still supports master). A branch basically contains a set of changes/commits or we can say that…


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Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

In the last blog, we saw what staging and tracking in Git mean. Staging is the process of adding files to the next commit to be made. We saw different commands for staging a file, removing a stage file, and see the status of the repo. In this blog, we will know about Git commits in detail.

A commit is an integral part of the Version Control System. The whole point of Git is to manage code. Commit creates a “checkpoint” or a “snapshot” for an instance of your repo when it's made. Commit…


Hey there. Hope you’re doing well.

In the last blog, we discussed setting up our folder to make it a Git repo and set basic configuration variables. In this blog, we will learn what staging and tracking mean.

Working tree: A working tree is a current state of the files that you are modifying currently. All the files edited in your project folder is said to be in working tree. The working tree contains all the files that Git is tracking, and any new files that we created and which Git is not tracking currently. …


Hey there! Hope you’re doing well.

In the last blog, we learned about basic Git terminologies. In this blog, we are going to prepare a folder in our pc through which we will perform all our Git operations. We will create that folder, a git repository, and set some configuration variables.

We can work with git repos in two ways. One, we start everything from scratch, and second, we can work with a copy of a repo that already exists somewhere. Here, we will first learn about creating a repo from scratch. The second method will be explained later.

Any…

Harsh Seksaria

MSc Data Science @ Christ (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, INDIA

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