Q&A

Cooking more doesn’t have to mean wasting more

A head of cauliflower next to small piles of cauliflower stems, florets, leaves, stalks, and ribs, respectively.
A head of cauliflower next to small piles of cauliflower stems, florets, leaves, stalks, and ribs, respectively.
Photos courtesy of Belmond Mount Nelson

With pretty much everyone forced into the kitchen, food waste is on all of our minds, especially because many are trying to limit trips to the grocery store. We talked to Rudi Liebenberg, the executive chef of Belmond Mount Nelson in Capetown, South Africa, who focuses on limiting waste as much as feasible.

Heated: Since home cooks aren’t cooking on the scale of restaurants, I think a lot of us might be daunted over whether we should be saving the stems of our cilantro or putting our fish carcasses in the freezer until we have time to make stock later…


Always cheese. And the freezer? Peas, the ‘best frozen vegetable’

Photos: Carrie Solomon

By Carrie Solomon and Adrian Moore

This Q&A with José Andrés is an excerpt from Chefs’ Fridges: More Than 35 World-Renowned Cooks Reveal What They Eat at Home, released in May and the second book from the authors, following Inside Chefs’ Fridges, Europe.

Heated: How many refrigerators do you have?

José Andrés: We actually have two — one in the kitchen and one in my garage. The kitchen fridge is for our daily use — eggs, cheese, vegetables, you know. The Hoshizaki in the garage is for everything else. My team and I do a lot of R&D at my…


Certainly not ketchup

The inside of a fridge full of veggies.
The inside of a fridge full of veggies.
Photo: Carrie Solomon

By Carrie Solomon and Adrian Moore

This Q&A with Enrique Olvera is an excerpt from Chefs’ Fridges: More Than 35 World-Renowned Cooks Reveal What They Eat at Home, released in May and the second book from the authors, following Inside Chefs’ Fridges, Europe.

Heated: Are you always so healthy?

Enrique Olvera: We don’t eat meat at home, only outside. So our home is pretty much vegetarian.

There’s no ketchup. Why?

Here we don’t eat ketchup. Everything is salsa. I don’t really know what we would put it in.

Is that a prickly pear?

Yes, that’s a chayote; we eat them…


Agriculture

Here’s why it matters

Aerial view of five farmers harvesting Chinese cabbage in Thailand.
Aerial view of five farmers harvesting Chinese cabbage in Thailand.
Photo: Anucha Sirivisansuwan/Moment/Getty Images

By Dr. Lewis Ziska

Balance is, without question, important in plant biology: Too much or too little sun, the right amount of rainfall, the right temperature range, and the necessary soil nutrients are critical to maintaining a healthy and diverse plant community.

But that stability is being threatened by climate change; in part because of peripatetic changes in climate, but even more by what is happening with carbon dioxide, the primary global warming gas. For the recent geological past (a couple million years, perhaps longer), there hasn’t been enough carbon dioxide in the air to maximize photosynthesis, growth, and yield…


Among other things, a lot of chowchow

Photos: Carrie Solomon

By Carrie Solomon and Adrian Moore

This Q&A with Carla Hall is an excerpt from Chefs’ Fridges: More Than 35 World-Renowned Cooks Reveal What They Eat at Home, released in May and the second book from the authors, following Inside Chefs’ Fridges, Europe.

Heated: You seem to do a lot of batch cooking.

Carla Hall: For our Thanksgiving and Christmas, we always have collard greens and chowchow, which is a pickle relish. I grew up eating chowchow. The first time I had to make chowchow was for an event. So I thought if I’m making it for them, then I’m…


This Danish chef has a lot of chiles

Photos: Carrie Solomon

By Carrie Solomon and Adrian Moore

This Q&A with Mette Søberg is an excerpt from Chefs’ Fridges: More Than 35 World-Renowned Cooks Reveal What They Eat at Home, released in May and the second book from the authors, following Inside Chefs’ Fridges, Europe.

Heated: Holy moly, there is a boatload of chilis in there!

Mette Søberg: I know! I brought a lot of dried chiles home with me from Mexico, when we did the Noma pop-up there. …


Everything you’re trying to figure out about bread and pizza

Photo: Romulo Yanes

Bread baking was transformed for the average home baker in 2006 when Mark Bittman wrote about Sullivan Street Bakery founder Jim Lahey’s no-knead bread in The New York Times after he learned about Lahey’s super-minimalist method.

“The method is surprisingly simple,” Lahey wrote in an email to Bittman. “I think a 4-year-old could master it — and the results are fantastic.”

People’s minds were blown. And the piece was a tipping point toward a renewed enthusiasm for baking bread at home. Before that, of course, there was Nancy Silverton’s La Brea. And Richard Bourdon’s Berkshire Mountain Bakery. And Peter Reinhardt’s…


Cookbooks

Direwolf shortbread, anyone?

Photo: Jesse Hsu

There’s never been a better time to retreat to a fictional world, so Heated talked with Jimmy Wong and Ashley Adams, the creators behind The Feast of Fiction Kitchen: Recipes Inspired by TV, Movies, Games & Books, about how to bring that spirit to the kitchen.

Heated: How did Feast of Fiction come to be? What is it about your love of food and fiction that inspires your recipes?

Jimmy: I was originally standing around my kitchen table with my brother and asking the question, “What book doesn’t exist yet that needs to?” and we came up with Feast of…


Cookbooks

We’ll start you off with pilsner pepperoni rolls

Photo: Lori Rice

It seems like everyone is doing one of two things: drinking or baking bread. (In some cases, both.) Heated caught up with Lori Rice, author of Beer Bread: Brew-Infused Breads, Rolls, Biscuits, Muffins, and More, to discuss her book and why you might want to add a splash of IPA to your next loaf.

Heated: How did Beer Bread come to be? Why did you start baking with beer?

Lori Rice: Back in 2017, I wrote the book Food on Tap: Cooking with Craft Beer. That book was originally pitched as a baking-with-beer book. But my publisher felt like a…


Three ways you can stop it now

Photos: Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision/Getty Images

By Ricardo Salvador

The coronavirus pandemic has exposed many of our society’s frailties — and here’s a big one: In the 21st century, we still operate our farms and food systems as if they were a 19th-century plantation.

Despite the technology and logistics we apply to producing and distributing food, it still turns on exploiting vulnerable people for their labor. Everywhere there are headlines about food-chain workers — the people paid a pittance to pick our vegetables, butcher our meat, stock and ring up our groceries, and perform other essential jobs for all of us — having trouble feeding their…

Heated Editors

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